Benefits of Piggery Composting

Composting has its many forms. As nature has its ways of making organic refuse into something that can be reused again. Even compost worms are made capable of converting natural wastes into an organic resource that can be both used to supplement garden plants or even farm soils. But one of the most remarkable discovery’s today would be Piggery composting. Pigs have been described to be the ideal cultivators.

Why are pigs considered the ultimate cultivators?
Having a few pigs, or a swine farm at that would be advantageous on your end. Pigs are capable of plowing and turning the earth (pigs even dig into the soil using just their noses), and rooting up weeds. These farm animals will dig beds for you, while they excrete their nutrient rich humus on your farms soils. Just as long as they’re confined in a spacious pen, they will be able to work and move productively on your specified areas.
Pigs love to eat!
Pigs love to eat fresh soil that has been nourished with organic humus (the best kind of soil would be from the areas that aren’t polluted, like the mountains for instance). It’s actually good for their health. So the lesser chemicals there are in the soil, the better health’s these pigs will have. But not only are hogs into consuming fresh dirt. They are also into eating grass, grass roots, tree roots, and a few other organic refuse such as wood, piles of cattle or horse manure. Now the consumption of these natural materials will eventually be excreted into a rich black soil. It’s just like how compost worms do it after a few months of breaking down kitchen scraps and garden wastes. Other than that, the organic matter that the pigs have composted will also contain a rich supply of live microbes. These live microorganisms can also be made into a good food source for the boars.
The value in biosecurity when composting with pigs
Whether it’s potentially acquiring something that is bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral, protecting agricultural animals from these should always be a priority when managing any type of farm. It is for each and everyone’s safety; and that’s why having biosecurity is important. It’s a system that helps protect animals such as pigs from different forms of contagious means (a good example of an outbreak would be swine flu). Aside from these, you can also reinforce your farms’ biosecurity by putting up proper signage for areas that are off-limits. You can also require your personnel and visitors to always wear protective gears such as cleans boots and coveralls when moving on to different locations.
How to keep your swine farm protected through composting
Using pigs to produce organic compost can already help wipe out some of the potential disease epidemics that can be acquired from the farm vicinity. The diseases that can be procured from other farming methods (such as the use of rendering trucks, fuel trucks or other foreign vehicles being entered on farming grounds, etc.) can be eliminated even just through composting with pigs.

Composting has its many forms. As nature has its ways of making organic refuse into something that can be reused again. Even compost worms are made capable of converting natural wastes into an organic resource that can be both used to supplement garden plants or even farm soils. But one of the most remarkable discovery’s today would be Piggery composting. Pigs have been described to be the ideal cultivators.

Why are pigs considered the ultimate cultivators?

Having a few pigs, or a swine farm at that would be advantageous on your end. Pigs are capable of plowing and turning the earth (pigs even dig into the soil using just their noses), and rooting up weeds. These farm animals will dig beds for you, while they excrete their nutrient rich humus on your farms soils. Just as long as they’re confined in a spacious pen, they will be able to work and move productively on your specified areas.

Pigs love to eat!

Pigs love to eat fresh soil that has been nourished with organic humus (the best kind of soil would be from the areas that aren’t polluted, like the mountains for instance). It’s actually good for their health. So the lesser chemicals there are in the soil, the better health’s these pigs will have. But not only are hogs into consuming fresh dirt. They are also into eating grass, grass roots, tree roots, and a few other organic refuse such as wood, piles of cattle or horse manure. Now the consumption of these natural materials will eventually be excreted into a rich black soil. It’s just like how compost worms do it after a few months of breaking down kitchen scraps and garden wastes. Other than that, the organic matter that the pigs have composted will also contain a rich supply of live microbes. These live microorganisms can also be made into a good food source for the boars.

The value in biosecurity when composting with pigs

Whether it’s potentially acquiring something that is bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral, protecting agricultural animals from these should always be a priority when managing any type of farm. It is for each and everyone’s safety; and that’s why having biosecurity is important. It’s a system that helps protect animals such as pigs from different forms of contagious means (a good example of an outbreak would be swine flu). Aside from these, you can also reinforce your farms’ biosecurity by putting up proper signage for areas that are off-limits. You can also require your personnel and visitors to always wear protective gears such as cleans boots and coveralls when moving on to different locations.

How to keep your swine farm protected through composting

Using pigs to produce organic compost can already help wipe out some of the potential disease epidemics that can be acquired from the farm vicinity. The diseases that can be procured from other farming methods (such as the use of rendering trucks, fuel trucks or other foreign vehicles being entered on farming grounds, etc.) can be eliminated even just through composting with pigs.

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