Recycle your Christmas Tree by Composting it

Recycle your Christmas tree by composting it
Believe it or not, many homes still use the traditional, all-natural Christmas tree to spruce up their place. But what happens to it when the holiday season is over? Well, the artificial ones get to be stocked in the basement, while the real, leafy trees gets to be thrown out of the house. But note of this as something positive, as the trees are thrown with a purpose in mind; and that goal is made towards the idea of composting. You can learn more about the process of composting trees by reading further of this article.
Reuse your Christmas tree wisely!
There are plenty of ways to recycle your pine-scent holiday tree. So as much as it has given your home a beautiful décor throughout the season, the nutrients it contains may also help contribute in beautifying your garden (useful for both indoor and outdoor grown plants). So by mulching or composting leaves, and chopping the barks for wood chips, you will be able to provide organic compost that will bring nourishments to low-quality soils, and even to shriveled-looking foliage. Naturally made compost is certainly a free, garden booster.
Where and when to start composting trees?
While others may charge for a pick-up, Christmas trees are typically hoisted from the curbside for free (a program that is usually ordered upon by the city). These trees are brought to several recycling centers, where the remains of it are composted and turned into mulch. But besides this, there are also basic rules that are implemented for every pick-up, like excluding garlands and wreaths. Most local governments are wary about composting and mulching other Christmas decors, particularly those that may contain wires and strings. These decors will definitely get tangled up in the wood chipper during the process. Now just imagine if red worms composted these scraps. These tiny creatures would probably cringe at the sight of having inorganic materials in their habitat.
Firewood and wood chips!
If you’re thinking about turning your own holiday tree into compost, then it sure is doable! For starters, you will need a few supplies such as an axe, chisel, hammer, and saw. You’re going to have to use these tools to help you cut through the wood (cut the tree by starting from the top). Now, the wood that you will be able to chop off from the tree can be used for fireplaces or even for campfires. You can also throw in the twigs and branches into a wood chipper, as a wood chipper will help produce plenty of wood chips that can be used as garden mulch. If you don’t have a wood chipper, you can use a power shredder instead.
The leaves on your Christmas tree can be converted into mulch
Other than composting, mulching the leaves of your Christmas tree is also a great alternative when it comes to saving landfills from further organic waste buildup. Your tree’s decomposing wood, especially the leaves, can be thrown into a composter or compost pile. You can break off the branches by hand, or even use some pruners to break these into tinier pieces. Use these organic scraps to supplement garden beds and other foliage.
Believe it or not, many homes still use the traditional, all-natural Christmas tree to spruce up their place. But what happens to it when the holiday season is over? Well, the artificial ones get to be stocked in the basement, while the real, leafy trees gets to be thrown out of the house. But note of this as something positive, as the trees are thrown with a purpose in mind; and that goal is made towards the idea of composting. You can learn more about the process of composting trees by reading further of this article.

Reuse your Christmas tree wisely!

There are plenty of ways to recycle your pine-scent holiday tree. So as much as it has given your home a beautiful décor throughout the season, the nutrients it contains may also help contribute in beautifying your garden (useful for both indoor and outdoor grown plants). So by mulching or composting leaves, and chopping the barks for wood chips, you will be able to provide organic compost that will bring nourishment to low-quality soils, and even to shriveled-looking foliage. Naturally made compost is certainly a free, garden booster.

Where and when to start composting trees?

While others may charge for a pick-up, Christmas trees are typically hoisted from the curbside for free (a program that is usually ordered upon by the city). These trees are brought to several recycling centers, where the remains of it are composted and turned into mulch. But besides this, there are also basic rules that are implemented for every pick-up, like excluding garlands and wreaths. Most local governments are wary about composting and mulching other Christmas decors, particularly those that may contain wires and strings. These decors will definitely get tangled up in the wood chipper during the process. Now just imagine if red worms composted these scraps. These tiny creatures would probably cringe at the sight of having inorganic materials in their habitat.

Firewood and wood chips!

If you’re thinking about turning your own holiday tree into compost, then it sure is doable! For starters, you will need a few supplies such as an axe, chisel, hammer, and saw. You’re going to have to use these tools to help you cut through the wood (cut the tree by starting from the top). Now, the wood that you will be able to chop off from the tree can be used for fireplaces or even for campfires. You can also throw in the twigs and branches into a wood chipper, as a wood chipper will help produce plenty of wood chips that can be used as garden mulch. If you don’t have a wood chipper, you can use a power shredder instead.

The leaves on your Christmas tree can be converted into mulch

Other than composting, mulching the leaves of your Christmas tree is also a great alternative when it comes to saving landfills from further organic waste buildup. Your tree’s decomposing wood, especially the leaves, can be thrown into a composter or compost pile. You can break off the branches by hand, or even use some pruners to break these into tinier pieces. Use these organic scraps to supplement garden beds and other foliage.

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