Ingredients that are Good for your Compost

The act of composting not only produces the richest kind of fertilizer known to date. It is also a natural process that aids in keeping the earth a garbage-less place. Now, compost only becomes nutrient-packed solely for the reason that the ingredients used for creating it are all organic materials. This composting by-product contains natural matter that is filled with nitrogen, carbon, and several other nutrients and elements.

Microbes thrive on compost
The production of compost can either be done through plain composting or by means of vermicomposting (creates compost with the help of red worms). Either way the creation of compost is predominantly done by live microbes. They are in fact, the ones that are mainly responsible for breaking down decaying organic substances. Now, live microorganisms thrive abundantly in a system that includes the most important of elements. Other than their need for nitrogen and carbon-rich materials, microbes also require oxygen, heat, and moisture to be able to work productively.
Compost ingredients that are high in nitrogen
Compost is mainly composed of a balance of nitrogen and carbon rich matter; and a balanced mixture aids in the microorganisms proper breakdown of organic scraps. Moreover, the addition of water into the mix also helps expedite the process of decomposition. But other than that, organic wastes that are high in nitrogen are typically green in shade. These items are mostly high in protein, amino acids, nucleic acids, and enzymes; and are typically composed of green tree leaves, weeds, grass clippings, plant cuttings, (can also be collected from your backyard, garden), fruit and vegetable scraps, coffee grounds (an exception to color), and the like. Now, for an additional fact: if there isn’t enough nitrogen in the compost system, the process will have a slower turnover.
Compost ingredients that are high in carbon
Carbon-packed organic scraps are actually those that are dry and brown in color. These can be in the form of dead leaves (autumn leaves can be a good example), twigs or bark, sawdust or woodchips, straw, mixed paper (composting worms love gorging on newspapers and corrugated cardboards), and so on.
The importance of heat, oxygen, and moisture in a composting system
For you to be able to create a nutrient-packed compost, you will also need to incorporate heat, oxygen, and moisture. Even if you’ve got an abundant supply of nitrogen and carbon materials, you will still need these three other components to be able to harvest a well-converted finished product. Heat is necessary when composting as this keeps the beneficial organisms from dying. Oxygen on the other hand helps speed up the process. Then again, a compost system may also go without it. The only setback to this would be a slow down in the process as well as the creation of smelly odors. Other than that, moisture is also a key element. The best consistency for your system is actually that of a wrung out sponge.
GardenWorms.com recommends offering your compost a balance of nutrients
Providing your compost with a balanced mix of nutrients, such as those that are high in nitrogen and carbon, will help you reap a wholesome finished product. So collect all of the ‘greens’ and ‘browns’ that can be gathered from your kitchen and yard, and start composting these today!
To know more about offering your compost a balance of nutrients, check theadvertiser.com here.

The act of composting not only produces the richest kind of fertilizer known to date. It is also a natural process that aids in keeping the earth a garbage-less place. Now, compost only becomes nutrient-packed solely for the reason that the ingredients used for creating it are all organic materials. This composting by-product contains natural matter that is filled with nitrogen, carbon, and several other nutrients and elements.

Microbes thrive on compost

The production of compost can either be done through plain composting or by means of vermicomposting (creates compost with the help of red worms). Either way the creation of compost is predominantly done by live microbes. They are in fact, the ones that are mainly responsible for breaking down decaying organic substances. Now, live microorganisms thrive abundantly in a system that includes the most important of elements. Other than their need for nitrogen and carbon-rich materials, microbes also require oxygen, heat, and moisture to be able to work productively.

Compost ingredients that are high in nitrogen

Compost is mainly composed of a balance of nitrogen and carbon rich matter; and a balanced mixture aids in the microorganisms proper breakdown of organic scraps. Moreover, the addition of water into the mix also helps expedite the process of decomposition. But other than that, organic wastes that are high in nitrogen are typically green in shade. These items are mostly high in protein, amino acids, nucleic acids, and enzymes; and are typically composed of green tree leaves, weeds, grass clippings, plant cuttings, (can also be collected from your backyard, garden), fruit and vegetable scraps, coffee grounds (an exception to color), and the like. Now, for an additional fact: if there isn’t enough nitrogen in the compost system, the process will have a slower turnover.

Compost ingredients that are high in carbon

Carbon-packed organic scraps are actually those that are dry and brown in color. These can be in the form of dead leaves (autumn leaves can be a good example), twigs or bark, sawdust or woodchips, straw, mixed paper (composting worms love gorging on newspapers and corrugated cardboards), and so on.

The importance of heat, oxygen, and moisture in a composting system

For you to be able to create a nutrient-packed compost, you will also need to incorporate heat, oxygen, and moisture. Even if you’ve got an abundant supply of nitrogen and carbon materials, you will still need these three other components to be able to harvest a well-converted finished product. Heat is necessary when composting as this keeps the beneficial organisms from dying. Oxygen on the other hand helps speed up the process. Then again, a compost system may also go without it. The only setback to this would be a slow down in the process as well as the creation of smelly odors. Other than that, moisture is also a key element. The best consistency for your system is actually that of a wrung out sponge.

GardenWorms.com recommends offering your compost a balance of nutrients

Providing your compost with a balanced mix of nutrients, such as those that are high in nitrogen and carbon, will help you reap a wholesome finished product. So collect all of the ‘greens’ and ‘browns’ that can be gathered from your kitchen and yard, and start composting these today!

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