Posts Tagged ‘compost bin’

Learn how a compost bin functions by visiting a Garden Center

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011
Garden centers can offer a lot of great assistance to both garden newbies and experts. Facilities like these not only offer useful gardening equipment and supplies, they’re also equipped at assisting enthusiasts when it comes to all things gardening, recycling, and composting. So if you’re interested in a composting venture, and would love to learn how to operate a compost bin for starters, then learn how to make compost by visiting a garden center near you. You will be amazed at how much interesting their workshops can be.
The essence of gardening
Every gardener loves to tend to a healthy soil that consistently creates healthy produce. So the best way to keep this stability in the garden is to keep the soil healthy, and to use nothing but organic based supplements for it (organic fertilizers and soil conditioners would be the best alternative to using chemically produced fertilizers). Here’s where organic compost comes into the picture. Compost can be created using scraps from your kitchen or yard; and these can either be done through piles or containing. Storing compost on the other hand will require a container in the form of compost bin units; and these can be found on sale at garden centers as well.
Ask for assistance when it comes to starting your own composting project
So you’re already interested in producing your own compost but you feel that you’re skills at building a system for it is too challenging on your end. No worries! You can ask for assistance at a garden center employee to help you set-up your new composter. And while you’re at it, try to also get as much information about composting from them to educate your further on the right ways to maintaining it.
The functions of a compost bin
A composting bin is typically used to store the usual organic food and yard scraps. Leave these scraps to compost for a few months, and it will eventually be able to offer you a fresh garden resource. But other than using it as a compact storage facility, it can also serve as a make shift home when buying worms such as red wiggler worms and nightcrawler worms (this is called vermicomposting). These worms have been considered as the most efficient workers when it comes to converting organic matter into nutrient-rich compost.
The basics to setting-up your own compost bin
Garden centers offer a lot of useful resources but you can always create your personal compost bin straight from your home. You can for example, turn an old and large Rubbermaid container (or any opaque-shaded unit with a lid on top) into an instant composter. Now every composter needs drainage and ventilation holes around it, so make sure to drill a few evenly spaced holes near the top surface and base. As soon as you’re done, fill 2/3 of the bin with moist organic bedding materials. These materials can be comprised of dead leaves, loose soil, used coffee grounds, and crushed eggshells. When you’re done with the set-up, close the unit. Also have the contents of the bin aerated and mixed on a regular basis to keep the system brimming with life.

Garden centers can offer a lot of great assistance to both garden newbies and experts. Facilities like these not only offer useful gardening equipment and supplies, they’re also equipped at assisting enthusiasts when it comes to all things gardening, recycling, and composting. So if you’re interested in a composting venture, and would love to learn how to operate a compost bin for starters, then learn how to make compost by visiting a garden center near you. You will be amazed at how much interesting their workshops can be.

The essence of gardening

Every gardener loves to tend to a healthy soil that consistently creates healthy produce. So the best way to keep this stability in the garden is to keep the soil healthy, and to use nothing but organic based supplements for it (organic fertilizers and soil conditioners would be the best alternative to using chemically produced fertilizers). Here’s where organic compost comes into the picture. Compost can be created using scraps from your kitchen or yard; and these can either be done through piles or containing. Storing compost on the other hand will require a container in the form of composting bin units; and these can be found on sale at garden centers as well.

Ask for assistance when it comes to starting your own composting project

So you’re already interested in producing your own compost but you feel that you’re skills at building a system for it is too challenging on your end. No worries! You can ask for assistance at a garden center employee to help you set-up your new composter. And while you’re at it, try to also get as much information about composting from them to educate your further on the right ways to maintaining it.

The functions of a compost bin

A composting bin is typically used to store the usual organic food and yard scraps. Leave these scraps to compost for a few months, and it will eventually be able to offer you a fresh garden resource. But other than using it as a compact storage facility, it can also serve as a make shift home when buying worms such as red wiggler worms and nightcrawler worms (this is called vermicomposting). These worms have been considered as the most efficient workers when it comes to converting organic matter into nutrient-rich compost.

The basics to setting-up your own compost bin

Garden centers offer a lot of useful resources but you can always create your personal compost bin straight from your home. You can for example, turn an old and large Rubbermaid container (or any opaque-shaded unit with a lid on top) into an instant composter. Now every composter needs drainage and ventilation holes around it, so make sure to drill a few evenly spaced holes near the top surface and base. As soon as you’re done, fill 2/3 of the bin with moist organic bedding materials. These materials can be comprised of dead leaves, loose soil, used coffee grounds, and crushed eggshells. When you’re done with the set-up, close the unit. Also have the contents of the bin aerated and mixed on a regular basis to keep the system brimming with life.

Question: How to Get to your “Done” Compost?

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

You’ve been layering your greens and brown organic material into your compost bin for months. The pH is perfect, the temperature is consistent and the worms are happily munching away making that loamy, rich compost you’re doing all this for. Now what? You top layers are full of the stuff you just dumped in, and you have no idea how to get to that compost at the bottom without mucking up your perfectly-placed layers.

Don’t forget the other important step of composting. Turning your bin. No, we don’t mean the bin itself, but those layers of materials that you have so painstakingly accumulated from your yard and kitchen scraps.

To turn your compost to get to the done, or even almost done, compost, take a pitchfork and stick in down low in the bin and turn the mass over, flip it bottom to top. Keep doing that until you have access to the bulk of your bottom materials and remove. You can let the compost continue to season in a corner or your garden or yard until the consistency is that of soil.

Another option is to buy a compost bin that flips over, so you can remove your compost from the bin with little effort, and less disturbance to your layers. The Urban Composter is just such a model.

Remember, keep turning that mass until you can get to the compost you want. Then leave the rest and continue on layering your way to rich compost for your yard and garden.

Holiday Compost Prep: Easter and Composting

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

Here Comes Peter Cottontail, and his baskets full of plastic-wrapped candy, plastic Easter straw and other amenities. Are you planning on having the family over for Easter Sunday? If so, chances are you’ve been shopping, doing your part to help out the Easter Bunny in his appointed rounds. The rituals and holiday celebrating that lead up to Easter can create a significant amount of waste, so this year, try to keep your celebration eco-friendly with the following tips:

Basket Filler

No. we’re not talking about the sweet treats and marshmallow peeps inevitably will fill the kids Eater baskets, we mean the Easter straw that causes the needle-in-a-haystack home for the jellybeans they get. In lieu of the plastic version, opt for the recycled paper straw for your baskets. It comes in a variety of gay colors and you can recycle it again once you’re done with it, or use it in your compost bin.

Sweets to Eat

So, we’re not at the point where kids want fruit in their Easter baskets (yet), but many times the chocolate and candy treats come in packaging kids have to shred to get to the delectable contents inside. Have your kids throw away their wrappers, containers and cardboard boxes to the recycle bin, not the trash.

Dinner Time

Having ham or roast turkey for dinner? Extra places to set at the table? Using reusable plates , cups and silverware in lieu of paper, plastic or Styrofoam may cause you to load the dishwasher an extra time, but there will be nothing more to go into the landfill after your meal.

Waste Not

When the festivities have died down and the plates are being scraped, be sure to toss all the food scraps except the meat and oils into your compost materials bin. Then take the scraps out to your compost bin and give your red wiggler worms an Easter feast of their own.

Jack of all Wiggly Trades: the Many uses of the Red Wiggler Worm

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

You’re doing your yard maintenance and have checked on the red wiggler worms in your bin. You may need to buy some more to replenish the few you had lost over the winter months, or maybe you want to expand the size of your compost bin. Or maybe, your red wigglers are doing just fine in your bin… there are still a slew of uses and reasons to buy more red wiggler worms.

A hearty and exceptionally versatile breed of worm, red wigglers are a sound investment for any of the following uses, as well as worm composting, of course:

  1. Sport Fishing
  2. Attracting Wild Birds
  3. Feeding
  • Pet Birds
  • Turtles
  • Iguanas
  • Aquarium Fish
  • Pond Fish
  • Salamanders
  • Snakes
  • Frogs
  • Raising
  • Trout
  1. Nourishing
  • Gardens (Bigger Tastier Veggies)
  • Lawns (Greener Healthier Grass)
  • Flower Beds (More Colorful Blooms & Stronger Stems)
  • House Plants
  • Hanging Plants

No matter what you need them for, order your red wiggler worms today!

Love your morning coffee? So will your compost.

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

Do you love your morning cup of java? Well, you’re not along. In 2000, the National Coffee Association estimated that 54% of the adult population of the United States drinks coffee every day and another 25% drink coffee occasionally. Gourmet coffee shops claim 18.12% of those coffee drinkers on a daily basis. The point? There is A LOT of coffee being consumed all around the US, and from the perspective of a composter, that creates a lot of nitrogen-rich compost materials to be found.

How many Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks coffee shops do you have within three square miles of your house? Best guess would say at least 2. Each of those coffee shops will have pounds of coffee grinds left at the end of any given day for which they have no use. How can you reap the benefits of our nation’s obsession with the morning cup, or cups, of coffee?

  • Coffee grounds are rich in nitrogen, a mineral that helps to maintain the proper temperature and pH level in your compost bin to obtain the very best results for your compost.
  • If you have an outdoor compost bin and your neighboring critters like to try to munch away at the organic material in your bin, coffee grounds are a natural deterrent so layer them on top of the kitchen scraps that draw unwanted attention from your woodland neighbors.
  • Coffee is perfectly safe to add to your bin if you are composting with red wiggler worms.

Stop by your local coffee shop and talk to them about getting a portion of their coffee grounds on a regular basis for your compost bin. Your local city dump and your compost will both reap the benefits.

Have a Compost Party!

Monday, April 11th, 2011

The smoky smell of a barbecue pit, the clanging of horseshoes being thrown, rows of cars parked along streets, the time is soon approaching when the spring and summer barbecues will take over your weekend schedule. While you plan your next festivities for family and friends, try and keep in mind how you can be eco-minded and make your party a party for your compost bin and the environment as well!

Getting Ready

Planning on a last minute grass cutting session? Need to prune your hedges to impress your guests?  Those great green materials can layer in with your compost nicely.

Paper or Plastic?

Paper plates and cups make the perfect choice for serving your outdoor barbecue fare, at least from a compost standpoint. To make things easy for your guests, place a trash can labeled PAPER in an easy to access spot so all of that paper waste ends up in the right place.

Full?

Sometimes people find that their eyes are really bigger than their bellies when eating at a party.  Remind your guests that you’re compost bin can handle many of their food scraps, all except for

  • Meat
  • Fish and Poultry
  • Cheese
  • Oily foods (may-based salads for example)
  • Butter
  • Other animal products

Having another easy-to-spot trash bin labeled “vegetable scraps” would be a nice way to harvest these remainders and relieve you of any plat scraping.

Enjoy the coming months’ outdoor festivities but your compost practices need not fail with the extra scraps. Use the party to your advantage to increase your composting efforts.

Step by Step Instructions for Starting your Garden Compost Bin

Monday, April 4th, 2011

You’ve always thought about composting, but up until now, it’s only been an idea you considered. You know it’s great for the environment and a responsible way to manage your yard refuse and garbage, you;ve just never gotten around to the how’s of it all. read on for a step-by-step plan to starting your own garden compost bin.

PICK A SPOT. You don’t need a lot of space to set up a compost bin. Clear out a 4×6 foot area of debris and leaves and level out the ground with a rake.

CHOOSE A BIN. There are several options of outdoor compost bins for your needs. Choose the size and design you like and follow the instructions to set it up.

BUY YOUR WORMS. Check out our hearty Super Reds!

FIND THE COMPOST MATERIALS. This is the easy part. Spend the day cleaning up your yard like you would any other time and use the leaves, grass, and organic stuffs to layer your bin. Next step – go thru your house garbage for coffee grounds, leftovers, or any other compostable materials.

That’s it. You’re ready to rock and roll with your worm compost bin. Put your materials in and then introduce your worms to their new home and watch the natural magic happen!

Preparing your Compost Bin for Spring

Thursday, March 24th, 2011

Have you seen them? Maybe in your neck of the woods you hear them instead. The long-sought harbingers of spring have returned. Depending on your geographic location, you have probably noticed the sounds of woodpeckers in the air or the sight of the first fat, red-breasted robin. Both are sure signs that warmer weather is around the next bend. Even if you haven’t seen wildlife returning, the longer days and increase in humidity signal that spring is on the way.

As a green-minded composter, you have spent your winter patiently maintaining your compost bin in preparation of this exact moment. Now, finally, you can begin to reap the loamy, nutrient-rich for its ultimate purpose, spring.

Take a walk out to your compost bin and see how it’s fared during the cold, drier winter. If you noticed that it is a little dry, then turn it to speed up the decomposition process. Is your pile a little fragrant and wet? Add in some heat-building “browns” like shredded newspaper or straw to up the temperatures and dry it out.

If you compost with red wiggler worms, give them a once-over to see if you need to replace any. Worms, like other animals, slow to a “crawl” during the winter. As they sense the arrival of warmer temperatures, they begin to wake up and eat at normal rates. Remember, a good worm-to-bin ration is about 500 worms, around ½ pound, for every cubic foot worm bin.

Sift through the organic material left in your bin and remove any debris. Fallen twigs or rocks make for difficult composting.

Once your bin is cleaned and your composting worms are in order, add in a fresh batch of layered browns and greens. Be sure to shred your materials extra carefully to help your worms begin the break-down more easily as they rev up towards normal decomposition rates.

How to Make a Composter or a Compost Tumbler

Friday, October 16th, 2009

In order to better understand the importance of worm composting as well as the role of composter and compost tumbler, we should first understand how to make one.

Compost tumbler defined

Compost tumbler is a convenient, easy and fast way to make compost at home just by simply using kitchen scraps and yard wastes and by incorporating worms in the composting process. It can be of great help because it efficiently combines up the content of your pile while evenly distributing its nutrients.

Making worm composting easy with the know-how of constructing a compost tumbler

how to make compost tumblerMaking a compost tumbler can be made in many ways using our ordinary tools at home together with our kitchen scraps or left over.  You can build a compost tumbler in any way that you want. You just have to make sure that whatever method is that, it should be dependable. You can also buy earthworms and make use of it so that you’ll be able to know how worm composting can make wonders for your plants. Well to make it more efficient, you should consider red worms or red wriggler worms.

And just to give you an idea how to make one, here are some steps:

  1. Obtain a ridged drainpipe whose division is 10 foot of a 24-inch.
  2. Take and cut the pipe into a size that best suits your taste for your tumbler.  Just be reminded however that when doing this, you should be sure that you can manage the tumbler size safely.
  3. At the end of the tube or pipe, if there is available plywood, all you need to do is just cut it. For it to be more durable you may want to alter it with a specialized kind of wood or you may simply use cedar plywood or a plexi-glass. Use a bungee cord to fasten the wood and also, use bolts of quarter-inch.
  4. Drill or bore holes to ensure proper ventilation for your compost. Cordless can also be used and this is in fact considered as one of the easiest ways.

After that, presto! You are done and you already have a homemade compost tumbler!
By following these instructions, you will be able to build a compost pile in just an hour. After seeing the advantages of the project, rest assured that you will be able to improve your investment as well as the quality of soil that you are using.
With all of these, why don’t you just make use of its advantages and be part of the growing population of the compost tumbler users now?  You will not just be an environment lover; you will also become a worm composting advocate!

Can’t find time to make your own composter? GardenWorms.com recommends the Tumble Weed Composter.

Tumble Weed Composter

Tumble Weed Composter

This easy to use compost tumbler provides functionality and durability for your composting needs for only $179.00.

Read more about the Tumble Weed Composter here.