Posts Tagged ‘composting worms’

How to Deal with Composting Worms

Saturday, August 20th, 2011

Worm composting is a process that occurs when decomposing organic materials are broken down with the use of worms. A joint action with composting worms and all the other beneficial microbes in the compost system creates the most nutrient-packed garden and/or farm resource. Learn from this page on how to compost with worms, how to control their environment and more.

Worm composting considerations
Composting worms will provide you with all the organic compost that you will need for your gardening or farming needs. But before that, vermicomposting starts with a worm bin set-up. The worm composter is then filled with shredded organic bedding materials, garden and kitchen scraps, and of course, your choice of worms. But given the basic steps to building your own worm farm, you’ll also have to take into consideration that these compost earthworms will require several other essentials. Red wiggler worms are the most favored worms when it comes to vermicomposting. They require several controlled conditions especially when it comes to the temperature, moisture content, aeration, and pH level.
The importance of monitoring the temperatures
Whether you buy worms from a local store nearby or from an online store, the way that you’ll be dealing with compost worms will all be the same (just as long as the worms are of the same species). It’s also important that you closely monitor the hot and cold temperatures when you’re raising and breeding worms. These weather conditions can actually hinder these worms from thriving normally. Now, when containing worms, make sure that you have an ideal temperature of 55 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit (more than 84 degrees Fahrenheit may pose deadly for your earthworm population). Other than that, also keep your worms out of freezing conditions. A temperature reading that may go below more than 50 degrees Fahrenheit may slow down the movement of these worms.
Monitoring the moisture content inside the worm bin
Compost worms thrive in moist environments. So keeping them under extreme dryness or wetness can cause them their demise. Born without any lungs for breathing, these worms use their damp body covering (their skin) to inhale and exhale oxygen. So always take note of these two factors when vermicomposting: dry bedding materials may lead to earthworms experiencing skin irritation, while very wet surroundings may lead them to drowning. Now, to let the oxygen to circulate in a constant basis, make sure that you also aerate the worm box.
The importance of monitoring the pH level of the worm bin
Composting worms thrive well in worm bins that hold a pH level of 7.0. But they can also endure levels that go from 4.2 up to 8.0. Now should the bin experience an imbalance or when the acidity level goes up, you can always neutralize the worm box by sprinkling some crushed eggshells or limestone. Also, limestone is different from lime so don’t mistake the two to be of the same element. Lime is an acidic material that can kill worms.

Worm composting considerations

Composting worms will provide you with all the organic compost that you will need for your gardening or farming needs. But before that, vermicomposting starts with a worm bin set-up. The worm composter is then filled with shredded organic bedding materials, garden and kitchen scraps, and of course, your choice of worms. But given the basic steps to building your own worm farm, you’ll also have to take into consideration that these compost earthworms will require several other essentials. Red wiggler worms are the most favored worms when it comes to vermicomposting. They require several controlled conditions especially when it comes to the temperature, moisture content, aeration, and pH level.

The importance of monitoring the temperatures

Whether you buy worms from a local store nearby or from an online store, the way that you’ll be dealing with compost worms will all be the same (just as long as the worms are of the same species). It’s also important that you closely monitor the hot and cold temperatures when you’re raising and breeding worms. These weather conditions can actually hinder these worms from thriving normally. Now, when containing worms, make sure that you have an ideal temperature of 55 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit (more than 84 degrees Fahrenheit may pose deadly for your earthworm population). Other than that, also keep your worms out of freezing conditions. A temperature reading that may go below more than 50 degrees Fahrenheit may slow down the movement of these worms.

Monitoring the moisture content inside the worm bin

Compost worms thrive in moist environments. So keeping them under extreme dryness or wetness can cause them their demise. Born without any lungs for breathing, these worms use their damp body covering (their skin) to inhale and exhale oxygen. So always take note of these two factors when vermicomposting: dry bedding materials may lead to earthworms experiencing skin irritation, while very wet surroundings may lead them to drowning. Now, to let the oxygen to circulate in a constant basis, make sure that you also aerate the worm box.

The importance of monitoring the pH level of the worm bin

Composting worms thrive well in worm bins that hold a pH level of 7.0. But they can also endure levels that go from 4.2 up to 8.0. Now should the bin experience an imbalance or when the acidity level goes up, you can always neutralize the worm box by sprinkling some crushed eggshells or limestone. Also, limestone is different from lime so don’t mistake the two to be of the same element. Lime is an acidic material that can kill worms.

Preparing your Compost Bin for Spring

Thursday, March 24th, 2011

Have you seen them? Maybe in your neck of the woods you hear them instead. The long-sought harbingers of spring have returned. Depending on your geographic location, you have probably noticed the sounds of woodpeckers in the air or the sight of the first fat, red-breasted robin. Both are sure signs that warmer weather is around the next bend. Even if you haven’t seen wildlife returning, the longer days and increase in humidity signal that spring is on the way.

As a green-minded composter, you have spent your winter patiently maintaining your compost bin in preparation of this exact moment. Now, finally, you can begin to reap the loamy, nutrient-rich for its ultimate purpose, spring.

Take a walk out to your compost bin and see how it’s fared during the cold, drier winter. If you noticed that it is a little dry, then turn it to speed up the decomposition process. Is your pile a little fragrant and wet? Add in some heat-building “browns” like shredded newspaper or straw to up the temperatures and dry it out.

If you compost with red wiggler worms, give them a once-over to see if you need to replace any. Worms, like other animals, slow to a “crawl” during the winter. As they sense the arrival of warmer temperatures, they begin to wake up and eat at normal rates. Remember, a good worm-to-bin ration is about 500 worms, around ½ pound, for every cubic foot worm bin.

Sift through the organic material left in your bin and remove any debris. Fallen twigs or rocks make for difficult composting.

Once your bin is cleaned and your composting worms are in order, add in a fresh batch of layered browns and greens. Be sure to shred your materials extra carefully to help your worms begin the break-down more easily as they rev up towards normal decomposition rates.

Worm Farm Instructions: How to Make a Worm Farm

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

As you all know, earthworms can be used in several ways. You can use them as live bait (or as animal feed), sell them for a profit (you can definitely post earthworms for sale), or use them for vermicomposting (where you’ll be able to get a new batch of worms and some organic fertilizer in the form of worm castings). So, if you happen to be a worm enthusiast, and is very much interested in setting up and knowing How to Make a Worm Farm, then here are a few Worm Farm Instructions that you can follow, to get you through the process.

So, how do you start putting together a worm farm?

Well, you can start by buying red composting worms, as garden worms aren’t much preferred when it comes to composting. Anyway, the first thing that you must do is to set-up your worm bin system (you may also want to consider getting those readily available composters for sale). You can either buy a box or a plastic container for your worms. This will be the bin for where to keep them (this will serve as their new home). Your worm bin will also be able to help you contain your worms, as well as give the worms space, for where they’ll be kept safe and warm. Of course, let’s not forget about drilling holes on the top, base, and sides of the bin. This will provide proper air circulation for the bin; as well as a drainage system, for where the worm compost deposits can be collected (may turn out in the form of worm farm compost tea, or as a liquid garden organic pest control).

What you should do next for your earthworm farming project is to put in some organic stuff inside the bin. You’re going to have to provide your worms a nice and damp bedding; as well as some organic food supply. But first, when building a worm farm, you should fill half of the bin with some shredded and presoaked newspaper (or cardboard). You may add in some potting soil afterwards; followed with some water. Now, the worm bedding should be kept moist. But make sure that it isn’t left soaking wet, as this may spoil the contents of the bin (and we wouldn’t want that). You should know that a moist surrounding for your worms will keep them happy. Worms happen to be moist at all times, since they breathe through their skin (they will die if they were left to thrive in a dry environment).

Red Wiggler worms for your worm farm

Now, you’re going to have to put in your compost pals inside their bin, when starting a worm farm. Put in kitchen scraps and garden wastes inside the bin, as these will serve as their food supply. You’ll also need to keep your worm bin in an area where there is room temperature (worms may tend to freeze to death if they were to be stored in cold spaces). Do take note about not overfeeding your worms too. So, avoid putting in excess food for them, as leftovers may decompose, which may then cause some odor build-up later on (it’ll be something that your worms won’t like, and is something that might attract unwanted pests). You can start breeding, raising, and harvesting a new batch of red worms after a few months.

From this overview, apply these simple steps, and use these information much like a worm farming guide to making a worm farm. These can be a simplified form to giving Worm Farm Instructions on How to Make a Worm Farm.

GardenWorms.com recommends the Worm Farm Kit

worm farm kit

Thinking about making more than a hobby out of breeding and raising worms? Fret no more! We’re here to provide you nothing but great Worm Farm Kit variations. Our worm kits come with 1,000 red wriggler worms, a starter bedding, a 3-month feed supply for your worms, a moisture retaining-burlap, and more! Order yours today.

To know more about the product, check the Worm Farm Kit here.

Selling your Vermicomposting worms

Thursday, July 22nd, 2010
If you’re planning on putting up a business out of vermicomposting worms, then now’s the time to do it. You can always breed, sell and make a profit out of red worms, at anytime you want. It’s simple as you won’t have to spend too much on start-up costs. You can always grow your worms and resell them to commercial growers; as well as sell to fishermen who like to make worms for fish bait. You’ll never have to worry about finding your niche in the market, as you’ll definitely never run out of customers too.
To get started on your money-making venture, you must first prepare the following things: red wiggler worms, earthworm bedding, soil, organic waste (worm feed supply), shredded newspaper, plywood, plastic sheeting, and containers. After you’ve gathered all of these materials, you may now proceed with your project.
Start by preparing your worm bedding first. You can either create the bedding or buy it. Either way, your worms will also be able to create more of this when they starting eating and feeding on it. Make sure that your worm bedding is always 12 inches high, as this will be beneficial for your compost pals. Also take note on the material that you’ll be using for your worm bin. If you’re going to use wood, try not purchase anything that’s been treated already. The same goes for plastic containers. The paint and stain (and other chemicals involved) may leak inside your bin; and this will definitely be toxic to your red wigglers. Going back, you should finish your bedding by filling it up with shredded newspaper and some garden soil.
After making your worm bedding, buy yourself at a local bait store, two pounds worth of standard red composting worms. Every two pounds of worms that you buy should be equivalent to a pound’s worth of organic waste in your home (2 pounds of worms = 1 pound of kitchen scraps), as this will serve as feeds for you worms. Your worms will feed on anything just as long as it’s organic. Never feed them meat-based products, dairy products, eggs, or oily foods, as these may harm their diet.
You may also start harvesting on your worm composting pals probably after a month. You can do this by pulling out the worms from the soil (remove about 4 inches of your topsoil first), and by placing them on a piece of plywood, and then eventually transfer them to a clean container. Do the same process until there’s no soil left, and make sure to cover your worm harvest with some plastic sheets, especially when the sun is still up. Also, wear your gloves when harvesting for worms.
You can definitely start selling your worms after this. But start by computing your start-up expense first; and then decide what your profit margin will start at. Afterwards, prepare the price for your worms. There are always sure buyers for your vermicomposting worms, you just always have to know where to find them.
Make a profit out of worm selling, as it’s always been a good investment. And should you want to improve more on how to raise healthy earthworms effectively, or just simply interested on learning about an earthworm’s life cycle, you may visit the Gardenworms.com/blog for more tips on vermicomposting worms.

If you’re planning on putting up a business out of vermicomposting worms, then now’s the time to do it. You can always breed, sell and make a profit out of red worms, at anytime you want. It’s simple as you won’t have to spend too much on start-up costs. You can always grow your worms and resell them to commercial growers; as well as sell to fishermen who like to make worms for fish bait. You’ll never have to worry about finding your niche in the market, as you’ll definitely never run out of customers too.

To get started on your money-making venture, you must first prepare the following things: red wiggler worms, earthworm bedding, soil, organic waste (worm feed supply), shredded newspaper, plywood, plastic sheeting, and containers. After you’ve gathered all of these materials, you may now proceed with your project.

Start by preparing your worm bedding first. You can either create the bedding or buy it. Either way, your worms will also be able to create more of this when they starting eating and feeding on it. Make sure that your worm bedding is always 12 inches high, as this will be beneficial for your compost pals. Also take note on the material that you’ll be using for your worm bin. If you’re going to use wood, try not purchase anything that’s been treated already. The same goes for plastic containers. The paint and stain (and other chemicals involved) may leak inside your bin; and this will definitely be toxic to your red worms. Going back, you should finish your bedding by filling it up with shredded newspaper and some garden soil.

After making your worm bedding, buy yourself at a local bait store, two pounds worth of standard red composting worms. Every two pounds of worms that you buy should be equivalent to a pound’s worth of organic waste in your home (2 pounds of worms = 1 pound of kitchen scraps), as this will serve as feeds for you worms. Your worms will feed on anything just as long as it’s organic. Never feed them meat-based products, dairy products, eggs, or oily foods, as these may harm their diet.

You may also start harvesting on your worm composting pals probably after a month. You can do this by pulling out the worms from the soil (remove about 4 inches of your topsoil first), and by placing them on a piece of plywood, and then eventually transfer them to a clean container. Do the same process until there’s no soil left, and make sure to cover your worm harvest with some plastic sheets, especially when the sun is still up. Also, wear your gloves when harvesting for worms.

You can definitely start selling your worms after this. But start by computing your start-up expense first; and then decide what your profit margin will start at. Afterwards, prepare the price for your worms. There are always sure buyers for your vermicomposting worms, you just always have to know where to find them.

Make a profit out of worm selling, as it’s always been a good investment. And should you want to improve more on how to raise healthy earthworms effectively, or just simply interested on learning about an earthworm’s life cycle, you may visit other blog posts for more tips on vermicomposting worms.

Vermicomposting in Garden Beds

Tuesday, June 8th, 2010

Vermicomposting in garden beds comes with different challenges.  You still do the same procedure except with the use of worm bin but this time, you do it directly in your garden beds.

The usual process would ask you to have worm bin where you will raise the worms until they excrete their wastes called compost.  This time, what you have to do first is dig holes in the garden bed.  However, you have to keep in mind that doing worm composting this way with the use of Red Wiggler worms isn’t as easy as the usual way.

Your first problem may be the temperature because you know very well that Red worms hate too hot and too cold places so you have to choose the best location.  Unlike worm bins, you cannot transfer the garden beds.  Remember that even if you do worm composting in garden beds, composting worms still have the same needs.

Once the holes are ready, put all the organic materials that you have.  You can use tea bags, coffee grounds, grass clippings, kitchen scraps (excluding oily ones), fruit peelings (except the acidic fruits like citrus) and other wastes.  As mentioned, vermicomposting in garden beds is like the usual process except with the absence of worm bins so still, you are not supposed to add meat, fish, bones, pet droppings, dairy products and other organic materials that were sprayed with insecticides or pesticides.

You may also worry about the artistic side of your garden especially if it’s a flower garden since the wastes are exposed.  Well, you can cover the garden bed with straw or coconut coir.  Dig or stir the compost pile using shovel to mix the materials and for sure, Red Wiggler worms will do their part.

Red Wiggler Worm Facts

Saturday, June 5th, 2010

To help you understand worm composting, here are Red Wiggler worm facts to introduce you to your composting worms.

Red Wiggler Physical Attributes

Red worms are hermaphrodite.  Having two sex organs, you can already breed them even if you only have two worms on hand.  Breeding for them is better under a temperature of 15-20 degree Celsius.

Also, red worms cannot see.  You may be wondering how they can detect light as they are afraid of it.  Well, Red Wiggler worms have light sensor which makes it easy for them to sense when they are exposed into such.  However, they can live with red light.

You also have to know that this kind of composting worm does not have teeth.  This is the very reason why you have to cut their food into pieces and why you have to shred their bedding.  It would be hard on their part to feed on big and organic materials.

Another truth about Red Wiggler worms is that they breathe through their skin that is why their environment should always be moist.  Air is also important because they are still aerobic organisms.

Red Wiggler and their Needs

Red worms can make worm composting effective as long as their needs are all met.  As said, they do not thrive on too hot or too cold areas.  Thus, a temperature of 50-85 degrees Fahrenheit should always be maintained.  The acidity level on the other hand should be kept at 6.0-6.5 as too much acidity may kill the worms.

As with foods, Red Wiggler worms can eat half or as much as their body weight.  You can give them a little lesser than what they need but never overfed them. Red Wiggler worm fact shows that a pound of worms can process an estimated amount of ¼-1/2 lb. wastes every day.

Buy Red Wigglers here!

Using Worm Farm Kits

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

worm farm kitWorm farm kits are very useful especially for those who are still new in vermicomposting. The materials provided in every kit will suffice to gear you towards the work of worm composting.  While you get all the information and pertinent instructions through the internet, it is still most recommended that you acquire a worm farm kit to make learning easier and more enjoyable.

There are different stores that offer different kits.  Each of course varies in prices.  It is advised that you buy the simplest one because choosing a complicated kit would also complicate your learning.  Don’t just pick what you think is good because you might get the kit for professionals.

If you already have the simplest or starter kit with you, make sure to read the instructions very well.  The worms are already given (mostly Red Wiggler worms are given as they are the most recommended composting worms) together with the bedding, bin and everything that you need in having a worm farm at home.  Your routine would usually be just feeding the worms because everything is already provided.  This is good because you save time and at the same time you get the chance to see how the process works.  You’ll be able to observe how worms burrow and how organic materials are converted into nutrient-rich fertilizer.

At first, this may just seem to be a hobby on your part but as you go along, you may realize that vermicomposting can really be more than just fun and enjoyment.  Once you’ve mastered how it works through your worm farm kit, then you’ll be more than ready to venture in this activity.  Who knows, this will also be your business in the future.  For now, you just have to be content with a worm farm kit and learn to do the process by heart.

Buy Composting Worms

Thursday, April 15th, 2010

Buy Red wiggler wormsYou probably have all the choices by now.  Well, you actually don’t need to search the internet when looking for the best composting worms in town.  It has been obvious and those who are really into worm composting can testify that the best breed is the Eisenia Fetida also known as Red Wiggler worms.  While there are also different kinds of composting worms like the European Night Crawlers, Red Wiggler worms still stand out among the rest because they have special characteristics that others do not have.

When buying, you have to take into consideration the burrowing capability of the worms.  This is important in the aeration of the soil.  You also have to consider the worms’ eating ability.  Well, you are doing vermicomposting so it means that the more organic materials are consumed, the more organic fertilizers are produced.  With Red Wigglers, you get all these things effortlessly.  They are able to dig up to 2 inches making the soil more fertile.  Red wiggler worms are also heavy eaters of scraps because they can consume half or even as much as their body mass.  Another advantage of Eisenia Fetida is their ability to multiply in just 1-3 months given the proper nutrition and environment.  You also won’t have to worry about  the environment because your kitchen sink and your garage would be best for your composting worms.

Now if you are wondering where you can get these worms, it’s also easy.  Because of the popularity of these composting worms, you can get easily find those in the market.  You may also buy from those who own stables or from farmers.  So if you are already thinking of starting your own vermicomposting and you have everything set except for composting worms, think no more. Buy Red Wiggler worms and have a good vermicomposting adventure.

Using Red Wiggler Worms as Bait

Saturday, April 10th, 2010

Red Wigglers worm seem to be so delicious for the fishes.  Though a bit smaller as compared to European Night Crawlers, Red Wiggler worms are as irresistible as the former because of its physical attributes.  You just have to learn the right technique and the right procedure in using Red Wiggler Worms as baits in order for you to catch your target fish.

Red Wiggler Worms as BaitThe most common mistake of those who go for fishing is the unequal size of their hook and their worm.  Fishes are also wise; they can easily detect whether someone is after them or not.  To deceive them, you have to make sure that your hook and your Red Wiggler worm is of the same size.  This will give the fish the notion that what’s in front is just a food.  This will further give you a better chance to get what you want because if you have a bigger worm and a smaller hook, what may happen is that the fish will only nibble on the worm until it eventually dies.  Remember that fishes do not like dead baits.

When ready, slowly sink the hook in the water.  Do not worry about your bait because Red Wiggler worms do not easily die once they are already in the hook and submerged into water. When you feel that the fish is already there, do not immediately raise the hook.  Allow more time for the fish to play with your worm.  You don’t also have to worry about your worm sliding from the hook because the Red Worm’s skin will keep its body from falling.  And when you feel that it has already bitten the bait, go and do what you have to do.

There are times when the fish, even while you’re already pulling the rod up will try to run away from you.  Well, that’s normal.  Do the process again and again.  Fishes are also not good on handling temptations so the more you lure them with your baits, the more that you get the chance of catching them.

Red Wiggler Worms for Garden

Monday, March 29th, 2010

red wiggler worms for your gardenYour garden wouldn’t look any better without organic fertilizer.  Aside from being chemical free, organic fertilizer also provides plants with nutrients that are really good for your family’s health.  Talking about organic, one way to have it as by vermicomposting through the use of Red Wiggler worms.

Red wiggler worms are very famous as composting worms.  The fact that they are voracious eaters of organic materials is already something.  They can consume as much as their body weight which means that the more they consume, the more wastes are converted to dark and nutrient-rich byproduct.  Red worms are also not choosy when it comes to food.  You can make them happy even with just your kitchen scraps and grass cuttings.  Just be careful in giving them foods that are with oil, insecticides or pesticides because it will surely lead to your worms’ death.  Also, be careful with your worm bin’s location because they only prefer moist environment.  A temperature of 50-80 degrees Fahrenheit would be perfect.

Another advantage that Red worms have is their ability to dig deeper into the soil.  They can burrow up to inches deep which makes the soil even more fertile.  It also improves the aeration of the soil.  When they have already produced their castings, the more that you can admire the characteristics of Red Wiggler worms.  Their waste is your benefit.  When those castings will be applied in your garden, your plants are sure to get the right nutrients.  In case you want the nutrients to be made available immediately, you can make a compost tea out of the castings and spray it directly to your plants.  This will help your plants’ water and nutrient holding capacity strengthened.  An organic fertilizer will also ensure that leeching is reduced so you will be worry free if you maximize the product of Red Wiggler worms.

So if you are really after a garden that is 100% healthy, raise Red Wiggler worms, do vermicomposting and enjoy the unlimited benefits of your vermicompost. The time and effort that you will invest will all come back to you abundantly.