Posts Tagged ‘organic gardening’

Eliminating Common Crop Diseases

Sunday, February 5th, 2012

Prevention Tips and Treatments for Common Crop Diseases

You may have encountered several common crop diseases. And you’ve probably pondered about the most effective remedies that can be used to treat specific plant ailments. But of course, prevention is always the best way to go. So starting your organic garden with a good foundation will certainly make it more impervious to diseases. You can keep your plot healthy by using organic solutions such as worm compost or seaweed spray, amongst other things.
3 types of Plant Disease: Bacterial, Viral, and Fungal
Any form of plant disease will aid in restricting a plants full development (preventing the crop from functioning properly). And such disorders typically fall under three kinds: bacterial (primarily targets the zucchini, cucumber, and melon types), viral, and fungal (the most common of all the three). For instance, bacterial diseases may damage the plant by simply creating obstructions on its pathways. These are the vessels that basically bring in nutrients and water to the plant. Now, viral disease on the other hand may cause crops to develop into mutilated-looking flora. Similarly, a plant that has been populated with a fungal plant disease has potentially been restricted of its food supply. Keeping the crop from receiving the nutrients that it needs to thrive will gradually weaken it.
Understanding the diseases that may attack your garden
Bacterial crop diseases can be tough to deal with. And this specific disease can affect a plant when it has lesions or other damages on it. Basically, the bacteria will be able to penetrate into the plant’s system by infusing a slimy substance through the wound of the crop. Now in contrast to this, a viral infection will attach itself to a plant host; later on producing more of itself inside the plant’s cell. Now most tomato plant diseases (leaves may show crumpling) rise up from a virus attack. A plant will start to show some discoloration (light green and yellow) and spots on it when the infestation progresses. In addition to these disorders, rust fungus is also as destructive to foliage. The harmful kind (as not all fungi are dangerous) can be found on any form of landscape or plant. Moreover, it particularly preys on other microbes’ food supply; and also causes lawns to be impaired with brown patches, mildews, blights, and others more.
How to control plant diseases
You can help prevent certain rust (plant disease) from attacking your garden by practicing a few preventive methods. You can start by determining the different common crop diseases. It’s always best to know what you’ll be dealing with, to get a more exact diagnosis. You should also know more of the foliage that you intend to plant. Make sure that what you’ve acquired are pest and disease free. Besides that, also make it a habit to water early in the morning, as keeping your plants dry by sundown will protect it from getting fungal diseases. Another solution is to practice crop rotation, as this can help decelerate the growth of clubroot spores. You may also use organic pesticides and fungicides that have been created to destroy disease-spreading insects.

You may have encountered several common crop diseases. And you’ve probably pondered about the most effective remedies that can be used to treat specific plant ailments. But of course, prevention is always the best way to go. So starting your organic garden with a good foundation will certainly make it more impervious to diseases. You can keep your plot healthy by using organic solutions such as worm compost or seaweed spray, amongst other things.

3 types of Plant Disease: Bacterial, Viral, and Fungal

Any form of plant disease will aid in restricting a plants full development (preventing the crop from functioning properly). And such disorders typically fall under three kinds: bacterial (primarily targets the zucchini, cucumber, and melon types), viral, and fungal (the most common of all the three). For instance, bacterial diseases may damage the plant by simply creating obstructions on its pathways. These are the vessels that basically bring in nutrients and water to the plant. Now, viral disease on the other hand may cause crops to develop into mutilated-looking flora. Similarly, a plant that has been populated with a fungal plant disease has potentially been restricted of its food supply. Keeping the crop from receiving the nutrients that it needs to thrive will gradually weaken it.

Understanding the diseases that may attack your garden

Bacterial crop diseases can be tough to deal with. And this specific disease can affect a plant when it has lesions or other damages on it. Basically, the bacteria will be able to penetrate into the plant’s system by infusing a slimy substance through the wound of the crop. Now in contrast to this, a viral infection will attach itself to a plant host; later on producing more of itself inside the plant’s cell. Now most tomato plant diseases (leaves may show crumpling) rise up from a virus attack. A plant will start to show some discoloration (light green and yellow) and spots on it when the infestation progresses. In addition to these disorders, rust fungus is also as destructive to foliage. The harmful kind (as not all fungi are dangerous) can be found on any form of landscape or plant. Moreover, it particularly preys on other microbes’ food supply; and also causes lawns to be impaired with brown patches, mildews, blights, and others more.

How to control plant diseases

You can help prevent certain rust (plant disease) from attacking your garden by practicing a few preventive methods. You can start by determining the different common crop diseases. It’s always best to know what you’ll be dealing with, to get a more exact diagnosis. You should also know more of the foliage that you intend to plant. Make sure that what you’ve acquired are pest and disease free. Besides that, also make it a habit to water early in the morning, as keeping your plants dry by sundown will protect it from getting fungal diseases. Another solution is to practice crop rotation, as this can help decelerate the growth of clubroot spores. You may also use organic pesticides and fungicides that have been created to destroy disease-spreading insects.

What is a Learning Garden?

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012
What is a Learning Garden?
A learning garden isn’t just an educational venue where kids, young adults, or grown-ups can discover, experiment, nurture, or even observe. A dynamic setting such as this can also be an educational tool that other individuals can learn several new things from (this can be a butterfly garden, a healing garden, a recipe garden, a historical garden, a canning garden, or an organic garden). Now, the concept behind the creation of a learning garden started in Europe, which was eventually adapted in the US in the 1890’s. Gardens that were actually built to teach intended to educate others on healthy eating, and learning more about sustainable options.
Schmitt Elementary School has a learning garden!
Schmitt Elementary School has their very own learning garden. The students, teachers, parents, and even several leaders of the community help contribute in developing the green plot. But other than that, the school created such a garden to help teach the students the value of producing organic food, eating healthily, and learning to be more friendly to environment, while keeping the program unified to the teachers’ activities and lesson plans. Putting that into perspective, the school has since transformed a dull space in Schmitt into an area that produces organic goods. The garden, which is just next to the playground, also exudes a vibrant and welcoming feeling to its occupants. Moreover, one of the many advantages to having such a garden is that a majority of the kids in school even get free lunches that used ingredients that came straight from it.
Hands on lessons from learning gardens
Students who take part in hands-on lessons are more likely to remember what their teachers have taught them recently. This gives them the opportunity to retain the processes of what has been directly shown to them. This also helps boost their self-esteem. Now organic gardening is in fact a physical activity. So getting into it will also demonstrate a positive outlook on their well-being (can experience an improvement in mental, emotional, and social growth). But other than that, this also helps them to be more aware of the kinds of fruits and vegetables that they should eat regularly (an increase in nutrition awareness is experienced). This also advocates healthy living and eating for the students, which is something that adults can learn a lot from as well.
The benefits to building a learning garden
Teaching institutions are able to get the most out of growing learning gardens since this helps them to tackle a variety of learning styles, which also goes with other interdisciplinary teachings. Such gardens can encourage children and adults alike, to know how to treat and spruce up Mother Nature, while appreciating the nutrition that it provides. Other than that, a learning garden can also encourage students (regardless of age and grade) to explore the ecosphere. This gives them the chance to play, to learn, and to become aware of what goes in their environment. This also encourages kids and young adults to get more involved in participating in community developments, while improving their gardening skills.

A learning garden isn’t just an educational venue where kids, young adults, or grown-ups can discover, experiment, nurture, or even observe. A dynamic setting such as this can also be an educational tool that other individuals can learn several new things from (this can be a butterfly garden, a healing garden, a recipe garden, a historical garden, a canning garden, or an organic garden). Now, the concept behind the creation of a learning garden started in Europe, which was eventually adapted in the US in the 1890’s. Gardens that were actually built to teach intended to educate others on healthy eating, and learning more about sustainable options.

Schmitt Elementary School has a learning garden!

Schmitt Elementary School has their very own learning garden. The students, teachers, parents, and even several leaders of the community help contribute in developing the green plot. But other than that, the school created such a garden to help teach the students the value of producing organic food, eating healthily, and learning to be more friendly to environment, while keeping the program unified to the teachers’ activities and lesson plans. Putting that into perspective, the school has since transformed a dull space in Schmitt into an area that produces organic goods. The garden, which is just next to the playground, also exudes a vibrant and welcoming feeling to its occupants. Moreover, one of the many advantages to having such a garden is that a majority of the kids in school even get free lunches that used ingredients that came straight from it.

Hands on lessons from learning gardens

Students who take part in hands-on lessons are more likely to remember what their teachers have taught them recently. This gives them the opportunity to retain the processes of what has been directly shown to them. This also helps boost their self-esteem. Now organic gardening is in fact a physical activity. So getting into it will also demonstrate a positive outlook on their well-being (can experience an improvement in mental, emotional, and social growth). But other than that, this also helps them to be more aware of the kinds of fruits and vegetables that they should eat regularly (an increase in nutrition awareness is experienced). This also advocates healthy living and eating for the students, which is something that adults can learn a lot from as well.

The benefits to building a learning garden

Teaching institutions are able to get the most out of growing learning gardens since this helps them to tackle a variety of learning styles, which also goes with other interdisciplinary teachings. Such gardens can encourage children and adults alike, to know how to treat and spruce up Mother Nature, while appreciating the nutrition that it provides. Other than that, a learning garden can also encourage students (regardless of age and grade) to explore the ecosphere. This gives them the chance to play, to learn, and to become aware of what goes in their environment. This also encourages kids and young adults to get more involved in participating in community developments, while improving their gardening skills.

Rooftop Gardening: Turning a monotonous-looking rooftop into a garden

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Most residential buildings have bare-looking rooftops that can be turned into a luscious garden. Now that most people are geared into creating eco-friendly spaces, developing a garden all the way up the roof is another option for city dwellers. Rooftop gardening is definitely the answer to turning boring rooftops into a beautiful plot.

Rooftop Gardening Facts

Rooftop gardening is not something that you can do whenever you want to. Unless you have your own roof to use, you’ll be required to submit and acquire certain requirements and approvals from specific authorities before proceeding to your garden project. Take for example the owner/s of the building, apartment, or condominium that you’re residing in. An approval to a garden set-up will certainly have to be requested from them. Other than that, there are also regulations that are stipulated by the city you’re living in, so make sure to abide by those as well.

Investing on Rooftop Gardens

Rooftop gardens are good investments. Not only will you gain access to a plot that grows fresh and healthy produce, you’ll also be helping the environment in return. How? Well, gardens such as those on the roof can help in improving the quality of the air (as plants release oxygen). We all know how certain cities can get so polluted from all the smog and smoke. But aside from that, gardens that are developed on the roof also provide a means of insulation for buildings. Such green roofs for healthy cities can also aid in delaying water run-offs after a heavy downpour.

Rooftop Garden Essentials

A sustainable roof garden design should have the following materials: a filter sheet, a waterproof layer, a roof membrane, a moisture blanket, some loose soil, plants, or seeds.

Whether you’re into developing flowers, fruits, herbs, or rooftop vegetable gardens, make sure that your green patch has a filter sheet. The layer itself will let the excess water to drain from the roof. The waterproof layer on the other hand will function as the roof’s protective cover. This is usually placed on top of the roof so that leaks will be avoided from ruining the rooftop.

A roof membrane should also be present in the construction of your roof garden, as this pond lining will be placed on top of the waterproof coating. The moisture blanket on the other hand is another layer (can be literally from old blankets or used cardboard). It works as a ‘growth medium’, making sure that the soil retains enough moisture into its system (to keep plant-life thriving). Now, soil is also essential when it comes to any form of gardening, as well as your choice of plants and seeds. These raw materials will become your last layer.

Plant your preferred plants

Rooftop Gardening also requires that you grow plants according to the weather conditions and restrictions in your location. Take for example an area that gets ample amounts of sunshine everyday. You can try planting shrubs on this type of setting.

Most residential buildings have bare-looking rooftops that can be turned into a luscious garden. Now that most people are geared into creating eco-friendly spaces, developing a garden all the way up the roof is another option for city dwellers. Rooftop gardening is definitely the answer to turning boring rooftops into a beautiful plot.
Rooftop Gardening Facts
Rooftop gardening is not something that you can do whenever you want to. Unless you have your own roof to use, you’ll be required to submit and acquire certain requirements and approvals from specific authorities before proceeding to your garden project. Take for example the owner/s of the building, apartment, or condominium that you’re residing in. An approval to a garden set-up will certainly have to be requested from them. Other than that, there are also regulations that are stipulated by the city you’re living in, so make sure to abide by those as well.
Investing on Rooftop Gardens
Rooftop gardens are good investments. Not only will you gain access to a plot that grows fresh and healthy produce, you’ll also be helping the environment in return. How? Well, gardens such as those on the roof can help in improving the quality of the air (as plants release oxygen). We all know how certain cities can get so polluted from all the smog and smoke. But aside from that, gardens that are developed on the roof also provide a means of insulation for buildings. Such green roofs for healthy cities can also aid in delaying water run-offs after a heavy downpour.
Rooftop Garden Essentials
A sustainable roof garden design should have the following materials: a filter sheet, a waterproof layer, a roof membrane, a moisture blanket, some loose soil, plants, or seeds.
Whether you’re into developing flowers, fruits, herbs, or rooftop vegetable gardens, make sure that your green patch has a filter sheet. The layer itself will let the excess water to drain from the roof. The waterproof layer on the other hand will function as the roof’s protective cover. This is usually placed on top of the roof so that leaks will be avoided from ruining the rooftop.
A roof membrane should also be present in the construction of your roof garden, as this pond lining will be placed on top of the waterproof coating. The moisture blanket on the other hand is another layer (can be literally from old blankets or used cardboard). It works as a ‘growth medium’, making sure that the soil retains enough moisture into its system (to keep plant-life thriving). Now, soil is also essential when it comes to any form of gardening, as well as your choice of plants and seeds. These raw materials will become your last layer.
Plant your preferred plants
Rooftop Gardening also requires that you grow plants according to the weather conditions and restrictions in your location. Take for example an area that gets ample amounts of sunshine everyday. You can try planting shrubs on this type of setting.

Gardening tips for the fall season

Friday, November 25th, 2011
When the summer term is over, you’re surely bound to rack up a lot of the previous seasons refuse. Summer has just ended, and in a few months, winter will be coming in. Gardening during the fall period actually presents the most perfect weather; as it is also the perfect time to plant trees and other foliage. So maximize what gardening in the fall may bring forth by reading the helpful tips from this page.
Water your plants well
One of the things that you should look out for when gardening during autumn is the condition of your plants. One of the garden tips for fall, especially if you’ve already planted evergreens or perennials, is to ensure that these plants are well watered. You’ll have to take this into consideration since you’ll also need to prepare the foliage for the winter period. In this manner, the moisture will be well retained (also goes in preparation for drying wind spells). Now, also make sure that by watering amply, you’ll also have to allow for it to drain away.
Planting tips and winter preparations
Winter may come as a destructive season. It may cause everything that surrounds you to get frozen in just a short period of time. So when autumn comes, you’re given the chance to prepare your plants for the forthcoming term. So even if you’re into fruit or vegetable gardening, make sure that you plant only shrubs and root trees that are bare. This helps the foliage to set well into the soil. Now, should you happen to have a few terra pots in your plot, make sure to also have these relocated in a more warmer place. This material actually has a tendency to soften when exposed to colder temperatures.
Gardening measurements
You will need to measure the root ball by width and depth, particularly when planting bare plants. Also make sure that a hole has been already dug. Now, the hole should be a little bigger than your acquired dimensions since it will help with the eventual growth of the plants. Restricting the plant the space to grow will only result for its roots to become bound. Moreover, planting in loose soil also helps the plants, as well as providing it with compost to further enhance their development (you may put some compost at the bottom and top of the hole). You can use the ones being produced by worm composting worms (also referred to as compost worms), or just plain compost, or mulch.
A few autumn chores!
Aside from watering your grass and plants during your fall gardening, you should also cut the grass and maintain the lawn. It’s also advisable to rake off all of the leaves and other dead foliage from your lawn right away, as these may leave some damages later on (plants and roots may rot).
GardenWorms.com recommends Ilona’s Garden
Get the ‘work and pleasures of the season’ by getting more autumn tips at Ilona’s garden. Get advice on how to tend to your garden during the fall, and get to know the best months for planting your favorite florae.
To know more about the website, check Ilona’s Garden here.

When the summer term is over, you’re surely bound to rack up a lot of the previous seasons refuse. Summer has just ended, and in a few months, winter will be coming in. Gardening during the fall period actually presents the most perfect weather; as it is also the perfect time to plant trees and other foliage. So maximize what gardening in the fall may bring forth by reading the helpful tips from this page.

Water your plants well

One of the things that you should look out for when gardening during autumn is the condition of your plants. One of the garden tips for fall, especially if you’ve already planted evergreens or perennials, is to ensure that these plants are well watered. You’ll have to take this into consideration since you’ll also need to prepare the foliage for the winter period. In this manner, the moisture will be well retained (also goes in preparation for drying wind spells). Now, also make sure that by watering amply, you’ll also have to allow for it to drain away.

Planting tips and winter preparations

Winter may come as a destructive season. It may cause everything that surrounds you to get frozen in just a short period of time. So when autumn comes, you’re given the chance to prepare your plants for the forthcoming term. So even if you’re into fruit or vegetable gardening, make sure that you plant only shrubs and root trees that are bare. This helps the foliage to set well into the soil. Now, should you happen to have a few terra pots in your plot, make sure to also have these relocated in a warmer place. This material actually has a tendency to soften when exposed to colder temperatures.

Gardening measurements

You will need to measure the root ball by width and depth, particularly when planting bare plants. Also make sure that a hole has been already dug. Now, the hole should be a little bigger than your acquired dimensions since it will help with the eventual growth of the plants. Restricting the plant the space to grow will only result for its roots to become bound. Moreover, planting in loose soil also helps the plants, as well as providing it with compost to further enhance their development (you may put some compost at the bottom and top of the hole). You can use the ones being produced by vermicomposting worms, or just plain compost, or mulch.

A few autumn chores!

Aside from watering your grass and plants during your fall gardening, you should also cut the grass and maintain the lawn. It’s also advisable to rake off all of the leaves and other dead foliage from your lawn right away, as these may leave some damages later on (plants and roots may rot).

Composting and Yard Care Alternatives

Thursday, October 29th, 2009

How about considering worm composting as part of your yard care alternatives?  It sounds good right? Instead of you spending much money for commercial fertilizers, you can already save by resorting to this alternative.  What else aside from being cost effective?  Simply put, organic composting is undoubtedly health wise.

Going Organic through Worm Composting

Worm Casting

Worm Casting

There can be no better way to handle your garden than by going organic.  What’s the first yard care alternative that you must put in mind?  It is establishing a healthy soil for your plants.

This is not a difficult task.  You would only need red wiggler worms or red worms for you to have successful and productive compost.  These worms are highly recommended when doing worm composting because they process wastes as much as their weight.  So once the process is done and you already have your vermicompost, you are already sure to have a healthy garden although you should be careful in choosing the right composting worms.  If you don’t have, then buy earthworms whose kind is also red worm.

Worm Composting plus Mulching Equals a Healthy Yard

After having the compost, mulch at least 3-5 inches of it.  This will provide protection to your plants by preventing weeds.

Chemicals as the Last Option

We understand that you may really be worried about your plants especially when weeds begin to grow and when pests and insects begin to ruin what you have worked for.   In situations when you see pests in the leaves of your plant, what do you normally do?  Do you get your pesticide inside your home and immediately spray it to your garden?  It’s actually wrong.

Often times, physical remedies are also important and should always be taken into consideration.  You may want to try removing the pest first with your hands to keep it from damaging your plant.  You can also use organic pesticides, traps or fabric row covers as preventive measures for pests.

And when you reach the point that you would really need insecticides and pesticides, choose the product that would not kill even the beneficial insects.  Be wise; choose the least toxic products.  Get the one that would not endanger your garden, your environment and most especially your health.

Other Yard Care Alternatives

When watering your plants, do not over do it.  To prevent evaporation, you should only water it early in the morning or in the evening.  Also, use water timers so that you provide only the right amount to your plants.

Consider “grasscycling” wherein if you mow 1-2 inches grass, you should not take those clippings away.  These are good providers of fertilizers.

Lastly, when you find a single or small damage in your plant, let natural predators take care of the problem.  Spraying pesticides immediately may worsen the problem.

Easy?  Yes it is.  Your yard will grow without you spending much for it.  Again, consider these alternatives provided such as worm composting and you will never ever regret.

GardenWorms.com  Recommends:

1000 Red Wiggler worms for vermicomposting

1000 Red Wiggler worms for vermicomposting

1000 Red Wiggler worms for having that perfect organic fertilizer called worm castings. Also known as “black gold” the precious worm poop is nature’s ultimate organic fertilizer that will definitely help condition your soil for healthier, greener and beautiful plants.

Fall / Winter Composting

Saturday, September 5th, 2009

Why Compost in the Cold during Fall or Winter?

  1. Thinking about green grass, hearty gardens and blue skies of spring can help ward off the winter blues.
  2. Remember your garden needs you now to be great in the spring.
  3. Give indoor composting a try.
  4. Turn down the heat, and try to reuse paper products.
  5. Start a car pool and reduce commute stress levels.

Benefits of Sticking with Your Composting in a Cold Climate

We’ve learned about the wonderful benefits that a compost pile can bring to our gardens, lawns and greenery, and while that’s fine and dandy when we can trip out to the bin in 60 degrees at dusk to maintain in, it’s a no brainer. However, it’s a little harder to find the motivation when the wind is howling through your back yard, you can’t find your snow boots because they’re piled out in the shed somewhere under the kids sleds and you’re fighting a drippy winter cold. Buck up, o great composter that you are, and have heart that while taking some effort, the benefits of composting in winter outweigh a little cold.

Once you’ve overcome the impulse to ignore your bin until the thaw, you’ve found your boots and taken some cold medicine; sit back down on your sofa and relax. There is less maintenance outside for composting in the winter because the whole break-down process slows in the cold. No need to turn the bin so frequently, because it needs to maintain warmth. The only real increase in work is with your brown and green products. These should be chopped small and added more often to the bin to maintain your nitrogen levels and heat. Keep it indoors in a bucket or bin by the back door until you have enough to blanket into your bin.

Composting in Winter can be Mentally Rewarding

Think about it. The sky is dark more than its light, you can’t do much outdoors without ski-pants or boots and the sky is a sickly gray a lot of the time. People can get depressed over these conditions, but composters have a remedy. Thinking about your compost bin keeps its benefits, that rich, dark soil, in the back of your mind with every chop of a green or brown material, every trip to the pile itself and every check on your red worms, if you use them. You get to think of spring every day. And “state of mind”, says many a psychoanalyst, adds more to our reality than environment, right? So think of spring as you’re carrying your materials out to your bin, and smile knowing that you’re doing good for the environment and your yard. Now go back in and don’t forget to leave your boots by the back door. Mud in the house is not eco-friendly. nor will it be appreciated by other members of the household!

GardenWorms.com recommends The Worm Factory

The worm factoryThe Worm Factory is a multi-tray worm composter that helps manage the composting process.
Fill each stacking tray with food scraps, junk mail and other household and garden waste. Worms start in the bottom tray and migrate upward as they break down the waste. This allows worms to separate themselves from the finished compost making it easy to add nutrient-rich fertilizer to plants and gardens without sorting worms.

$79.95 Plus $19.95 for Shipping and Handling