Posts Tagged ‘organic pesticides’

Safe and natural insecticides that you can create at home

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

Do you have what it takes to create your own natural insecticides? Sure you can! There are a lot of DIY natural insecticides that can be done easily. You’ll even be surprised with the materials and ingredients that you no longer have to buy out, as you already have some of these at home at your easy disposal. You can read up more from this page to start cooking up your homemade natural pest control remedies.

Creating a safe and effective natural pest repellant without using any hazardous chemicals
Before resorting to homemade organic pesticide products, you may want to practice companion planting along with some intense gardening first. This process helps keep sorted plants together, so that when a specific disease strikes, these plants will be able to deter these ailments collectively.
Recipe # 1 – Hot Peppers
Another food staple that has been part of the human diet would be Hot Peppers. You can use these spicy plants to concoct a natural pesticide creation. You can either use these as is or use the ones that are already in powder form. Hot peppers are actually great at deterring soft-bodied insects. These insects fall into their gradual demise by experiencing a burning feeling. This can be used as an organic ant control.
Recipe # 2 – Onions and Garlic
Onions and Garlic are staples when it comes to cooking. So gather both ingredients and have these crushed and soaked in some vegetable oil tea. If you intend to produce a gallon worth of this liquefied repellant, then you’ll need to use several garlic cloves to match its consistency.
Recipe # 3 – Natural Oils
You can have your pick of natural oils to use when creating a natural insecticide. You can even choose to use vegetable oils and Canola oils. Now, use these oils as a spray to help eliminate soft-bodied insects (should be created using only 1 cup of oil to 1 gallon of water). Also note that when you’re spraying these oils directly on insects that are lodged on delicate-growing plants, make sure to limit your sprays. Too much spraying may actually lead to burning the leaves of the plants.
Recipe # 4 – Tea from Compost
If you have a compost system, especially the worm composting type that’s brewing in your backyard, then you might as well use this to create compost tea. Compost from worms that’s been wrapped with an old sock can be soaked in chlorine-free water for 24 hours. 5 gallons of water, 2 handfuls of worm castings, some molasses or corn syrup, and a bubbler are all that you will need to concoct this mix. Use this immediately as a spray to maximize the contents (as it contains a lot of beneficial microbes).
Recipe # 5 – Gardeners use soap to repel insects
One of the many effective natural insecticides would be soap. The use of soap to deter bugs dates back to as far as the 1800s. So you can definitely rely on this product to provide you with other qualities other than washing off the dirt from your dishes or your clothes. You can use dishwashing liquids (such as the Ivory liquid dishwashing detergent), and have these diluted with water. You can use this as a spray but only spray using the recommended dosages (too much of something can cause plant damage, etc.).

Do you have what it takes to create your own natural insecticides? Sure you can! There are a lot of DIY natural insecticides that can be done easily. You’ll even be surprised with the materials and ingredients that you no longer have to buy out, as you already have some of these at home at your easy disposal. You can read up more from this page to start cooking up your homemade natural pest control remedies.

Creating a safe and effective natural pest repellant without using any hazardous chemicals

Before resorting to homemade organic pesticide products, you may want to practice companion planting along with some intense gardening first. This process helps keep sorted plants together, so that when a specific disease strikes, these plants will be able to deter these ailments collectively.

Recipe # 1 – Hot Peppers

Another food staple that has been part of the human diet would be Hot Peppers. You can use these spicy plants to concoct a natural pesticide creation. You can either use these as is or use the ones that are already in powder form. Hot peppers are actually great at deterring soft-bodied insects. These insects fall into their gradual demise by experiencing a burning feeling. This can be used as an organic ant control.

Recipe # 2 – Onions and Garlic

Onions and Garlic are staples when it comes to cooking. So gather both ingredients and have these crushed and soaked in some vegetable oil tea. If you intend to produce a gallon worth of this liquefied repellant, then you’ll need to use several garlic cloves to match its consistency.

Recipe # 3 – Natural Oils

You can have your pick of natural oils to use when creating a natural insecticide. You can even choose to use vegetable oils and Canola oils. Now, use these oils as a spray to help eliminate soft-bodied insects (should be created using only 1 cup of oil to 1 gallon of water). Also note that when you’re spraying these oils directly on insects that are lodged on delicate-growing plants, make sure to limit your sprays. Too much spraying may actually lead to burning the leaves of the plants.

Recipe # 4 – Tea from Compost

If you have a compost system, especially the worm composting type that’s brewing in your backyard, then you might as well use this to create compost tea. Compost from worms that’s been wrapped with an old sock can be soaked in chlorine-free water for 24 hours. 5 gallons of water, 2 handfuls of worm castings, some molasses or corn syrup, and a bubbler are all that you will need to concoct this mix. Use this immediately as a spray to maximize the contents (as it contains a lot of beneficial microbes).

Recipe # 5 – Gardeners use soap to repel insects

One of the many effective natural insecticides would be soap. The use of soap to deter bugs dates back to as far as the 1800s. So you can definitely rely on this product to provide you with other qualities other than washing off the dirt from your dishes or your clothes. You can use dishwashing liquids (such as the Ivory liquid dishwashing detergent), and have these diluted with water. You can use this as a spray but only spray using the recommended dosages (too much of something can cause plant damage, etc.).

Why Organic Pesticides are much Safer

Thursday, October 13th, 2011
Chemical pesticides may have its pro’s to its use. But several studies have already emerged that the use of such products may also cause impairments to human beings. If there really were a need for insect repellants (especially if you’re into gardening, farming, etc.), then it would still be a better alternative to go for the organic based products, such as that of organic pesticides.
Why a certain pesticide called ‘Organochlorines’ were banned from the US
According to a recent study conducted by the researchers of the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare, Organochlorines were found on pesticide. It’s recognized as ‘Persistent Organic Pollutants’, pollutants that may aid in generating the diabetes disease in humans. These POPs work by damaging the part of the body that produces glucose; and the people that are more at risk of being affected by these POPs would be the overweight individuals.
The connection between pesticides and birth defects, and other diseases
A group of Chinese researchers have also come to associate the use of pesticides to women bearing children with abnormalities. A number of Chinese women were examined and were found to have high percentages of chemicals in their placenta after giving birth (such chemicals were linked to insecticides and from coal smoke inhalation). Other than these birth anomalies, diseases such as nerve ailments and certain cancers were also linked to the use of these toxic products. Most of the people that also get hit by these non-organic pesticides are not just the mothers and children; the elderly are put to risk as well.
Why Chemical Pesticides are harmful to exposed citizens
Exposing yourself to the use of synthetic insect repellants without the proper gears can definitely endanger not just yourself, but the people around you as well. Just take for example some farm companies that endanger their workers’ health with their limitations: insufficient when it comes to protective gears, no hand washing or toilet facilities, no drinking water, etc. These are not safe practices, and should be well managed by companies that frequently use these synthetic products.
Organic Pesticides – A Safer Substitute
An organic garden pest control, particularly the kind that’s been produced and harvested from worms is teeming with microbial activity. Since compost worms such as red wiggler worms only consume natural wastes (kitchen scraps and other garden wastes), you can be assured of a safer substitute to chemical insecticides. Now, the best part about using worm compost is that it contains a healthy population of beneficial microorganisms. These microbes that are contained in the worm poop can be instantly applied on both garden/farm soil and produce without having to worry about burns or other harmful side effects. Right after an application, these good bacteria will then aid in destroying pathogens, and will also help deter certain insects. Of course, the other perks to using organic pesticides would be that your soil and produce would be able to experience an improvement in their other properties.

Chemical pesticides may have its pro’s to its use. But several studies have already emerged that the use of such products may also cause impairments to human beings. If there really were a need for insect repellants (especially if you’re into gardening, farming, etc.), then it would still be a better alternative to go for the organic based products, such as that of organic pesticides.

Why a certain pesticide called ‘Organochlorines’ were banned from the US

According to a recent study conducted by the researchers of the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare, Organochlorines were found on pesticide. It’s recognized as ‘Persistent Organic Pollutants’, pollutants that may aid in generating the diabetes disease in humans. These POPs work by damaging the part of the body that produces glucose; and the people that are more at risk of being affected by these POPs would be the overweight individuals.

The connection between pesticides and birth defects, and other diseases

A group of Chinese researchers have also come to associate the use of pesticides to women bearing children with abnormalities. A number of Chinese women were examined and were found to have high percentages of chemicals in their placenta after giving birth (such chemicals were linked to insecticides and from coal smoke inhalation). Other than these birth anomalies, diseases such as nerve ailments and certain cancers were also linked to the use of these toxic products. Most of the people that also get hit by these non-organic pesticides are not just the mothers and children; the elderly are put to risk as well.

Why Chemical Pesticides are harmful to exposed citizens

Exposing yourself to the use of synthetic insect repellants without the proper gears can definitely endanger not just yourself, but the people around you as well. Just take for example some farm companies that endanger their workers’ health with their limitations: insufficient when it comes to protective gears, no hand washing or toilet facilities, no drinking water, etc. These are not safe practices, and should be well managed by companies that frequently use these synthetic products.

Organic Pesticides – A Safer Substitute

An organic garden pest control, particularly the kind that’s been produced and harvested from worms is teeming with microbial activity. Since compost worms such as red wiggler worms only consume natural wastes (kitchen scraps and other garden wastes), you can be assured of a safer substitute to chemical insecticides. Now, the best part about using worm compost is that it contains a healthy population of beneficial microorganisms. These microbes that are contained in the worm poop can be instantly applied on both garden/farm soil and produce without having to worry about burns or other harmful side effects. Right after an application, these good bacteria will then aid in destroying pathogens, and will also help deter certain insects. Of course, the other perks to using organic pesticides would be that your soil and produce would be able to experience an improvement in their other properties.

Organic Pest Control for Grub Damage

Monday, August 23rd, 2010
If you suddenly see patches of yellow spots on your once-beautiful lawn, then you’ve probably got some Grub Damage currently taking place. But before you get right ahead into resolving this problem, it’s best to determine if it’s really Grubs that are destroying your lawn. And if you happen to confirm this, then you can always resort into using some organic pest control that can be used to kill grubs. You won’t have to find the need to use chemical insecticides, as there are many organic alternative that can be used to poison the grub, without harming you, your family, and your pets.
So what are grubs exactly? Well, this grub worm (larval stage) actually has three kinds: (the adult stage) the Japanese Beetles, the June Beetles, and the Chafer grubs. You’ll be able to identify them right away if you see an an off-white skinned insect, with a dark head. Grubs are also usually seen formed in a C-shape position.
White grubs like eating grass roots, which then leads to the grass dying, and the lawn patching (usually brown patches). Patches on the lawn will only turn yellow (will feel a bit spongy when you try to walk on the affected areas) if the grub have greatly damaged it. You’ll also know that there’s been a lot of damage if you start to effortlessly lift up patches of grass on your lawn.
So what can you do to control grubs? If your lawn has about a few grubs per square foot, then it’s not much of a problem. But if there were more (like more than ten per square foot), then you’ll have to resort to having the lawn treated right away.
Killing grubs would be best done when they’re still young, as they will be easier to manage. You’ll know that you’ve got some young grubs present when they start showing up between the months of March to April, or mid-July to September. You can get rid of grubs during these months (kill them during this timeframe so that you’ll still have them in their smaller sizes).
You can also practice some preventive measures before resorting to using some organic grub control. You can start by taking care of your lawn to lessen the damages that may further harm it. What you can do also is to not water your lawn regularly. Beetles actually prefer thriving in areas that have grass, and has a constantly moist soil.
Now, if things do worsen, then you can start treating these pests with some organic pesticides. You can use an organic alternative to eradicating these grubs, by starting with a combination of Milky Spore Grub Control (only apply once), and Nemaseek Beneficial Nemotodes. The nematodes will be the one responsible in getting the Milky Spore spread out. You can apply some Nemaseek Beneficial Nemotodes again, after about six months (starting from the time that you first applied it). This will help control further grub damage and growth on your lawn; and to also scatter Milky Spore. Another option for you to use would be is Grub Beater (has neem as an effective ingredient. Use this if the grub infestation has gotten much worse. Although there are more options to organic grubicides or organic pest control rather, they may be hard to get a hold of. So it’ll be a good idea to look them up online (try typing in organic insectides).
GardenWorms.com recommends the Milky Spore Grub Control
Get the Milky Spore Grub Control for only $29.95! It’s the safest material that can definitely be used to control grub existence on your lawn (targets and discriminately works in eliminating white grubs). Not only that, it will provide your lawn an on-guard protective blanket; and will not harm any beneficial insects, humans or pets that may get into contact with it.
To know more about the product, check the Milky Spore Grub Control here.

Dirt GrubIf you suddenly see patches of yellow spots on your once-beautiful lawn, then you’ve probably got some Grub Damage currently taking place. But before you get right ahead into resolving this problem, it’s best to determine if it’s really Grubs that are destroying your lawn. And if you happen to confirm this, then you can always resort into using some organic pest control that can be used to kill grubs. You won’t have to find the need to use chemical insecticides, as there are many organic alternative that can be used to poison the grub, without harming you, your family, and your pets.

So what are grubs exactly?

Well, this grub worm (larval stage) actually has three kinds: (the adult stage) the Japanese Beetles, the June Beetles, and the Chafer grubs. You’ll be able to identify them right away if you see an an off-white skinned insect, with a dark head. Grubs are also usually seen formed in a C-shape position.

White grubs like eating grass roots, which then leads to the grass dying, and the lawn patching (usually brown patches). Patches on the lawn will only turn yellow (will feel a bit spongy when you try to walk on the affected areas) if the grub have greatly damaged it. You’ll also know that there’s been a lot of damage if you start to effortlessly lift up patches of grass on your lawn.

What can you do to control grubs?

If your lawn has about a few grubs per square foot, then it’s not much of a problem. But if there were more (like more than ten per square foot), then you’ll have to resort to having the lawn treated right away.

Killing grubs would be best done when they’re still young, as they will be easier to manage. You’ll know that you’ve got some young grubs present when they start showing up between the months of March to April, or mid-July to September. You can get rid of grubs during these months (kill them during this timeframe so that you’ll still have them in their smaller sizes).

You can also practice some preventive measures before resorting to using some organic grub control. You can start by taking care of your lawn to lessen the damages that may further harm it. What you can do also is to not water your lawn regularly. Beetles actually prefer thriving in areas that have grass, and has a constantly moist soil.

Organic Pesticides for Grubs

Now, if things do worsen, then you can start treating these pests with some organic pesticides. You can use an organic alternative to eradicating these grubs, by starting with a combination of Milky Spore Grub Control (only apply once), and Nemaseek Beneficial Nemotodes. The nematodes will be the one responsible in getting the Milky Spore spread out. You can apply some Nemaseek Beneficial Nemotodes again, after about six months (starting from the time that you first applied it). This will help control further grub damage and growth on your lawn; and to also scatter Milky Spore. Another option for you to use would be is Grub Beater (has neem as an effective ingredient. Use this if the grub infestation has gotten much worse. Although there are more options to organic grubicides or organic pest control rather, they may be hard to get a hold of. So it’ll be a good idea to look them up online (try typing in organic insectides).

GardenWorms.com recommends the Milky Spore Grub Control

Get the Milky Spore Grub Control for only $29.95! It’s the safest material that can definitely be used to control grub existence on your lawn (targets and discriminately works in eliminating white grubs). Not only that, it will provide your lawn an on-guard protective blanket; and will not harm any beneficial insects, humans or pets that may get into contact with it.

To know more about the product, check the Milky Spore Grub Control here.