Posts Tagged ‘recycling’

The recycling efforts of New York City

Friday, January 27th, 2012
The recycling efforts of New York City
New York has a remarkable way of making its presence known to the whole world. So other than being one of the fashion meccas, and being immediately recognized for the Statue of Liberty, is the city as notable when it comes to recycling? Well, the city is definitely getting there. Learn more about the recycling efforts of NYC by reading further of this article.
An innovated city should also be the greenest!
New York City’s mayor, Mr. Michael R. Bloomberg, believes that if NYC is recognized as one of the most state-of-the-art cities in the world, then it should also be the eco-friendliest. And by being maintaining a ‘green’ status, will the city be made more appealing to the most progressive and forward-thinking individuals and businesses.
Supporting NYC’s Recycling Plans
The mayor is deeply committed on advocating not just a New York City recycling program (a residential recycling program which has been neglected for quite some time now). He is also looking into other similar programs that will further boost the capital’s plans of recovering organic wastes, and preventing salvageable trash from building up in landfills. Other than that, Mayor Bloomberg is also aiming to achieve a garbage-less town. This will be done by targeting a certain percentage, which will be done by increasing the present 15% of garbage collections to 30%. It will be a plan that will be pursued up until the year 2017.
Composting and Recycling for NYC
Composting and recycling are two things that will always work well with each other. And this works especially well for the programs that has been plotted out for the city. Now several plans for the city have been thought of well, like the launching of two sites that will help accommodate recycling per se, and the production of compost (through a compost yard) using just organic wastes collected from residences and establishments. The mayor also urges to increase the number of public recycling containers from 600 to 1,000 pieces by the year 2014.
Challenging every New Yorkers efforts to be ‘green’
It’s usually easier said than done. That is why New Yorkers will be greatly challenged with the kind of commitment that the city expects from each one of them. Of course, fulfilling the exact details to the NYC recycling plan/guide is crucial, as well as providing for it the right execution. This will certainly be NYC’s biggest challenge yet.
More economical plans for NYC’s recycling programs
The city of New York is also planning on testing a few new machineries that specializes on creating renewable energy. New equipment will be tried out to see if they can start breaking down the city’s trash into electricity and heat. Now, a prospective recycling installation such as this will help keep out 135,000 tons worth of garbage out of the city, annually (according to recycling statistics).

New York has a remarkable way of making its presence known to the whole world. So other than being one of the fashion meccas, and being immediately recognized for the Statue of Liberty, is the city as notable when it comes to recycling? Well, the city is definitely getting there. Learn more about the recycling efforts of NYC by reading further of this article.

An innovated city should also be the greenest!

New York City’s mayor, Mr. Michael R. Bloomberg, believes that if NYC is recognized as one of the most state-of-the-art cities in the world, then it should also be the eco-friendliest. And by being maintaining a ‘green’ status, will the city be made more appealing to the most progressive and forward-thinking individuals and businesses.

Supporting NYC’s Recycling Plans

The mayor is deeply committed on advocating not just a New York City recycling program (a residential recycling program which has been neglected for quite some time now). He is also looking into other similar programs that will further boost the capital’s plans of recovering organic wastes, and preventing salvageable trash from building up in landfills. Other than that, Mayor Bloomberg is also aiming to achieve a garbage-less town. This will be done by targeting a certain percentage, which will be done by increasing the present 15% of garbage collections to 30%. It will be a plan that will be pursued up until the year 2017.

Composting and Recycling for NYC

Community composting and recycling are two things that will always work well with each other. And this works especially well for the programs that has been plotted out for the city. Now several plans for the city have been thought of well, like the launching of two sites that will help accommodate recycling per se, and the production of compost (through a compost yard) using just organic wastes collected from residences and establishments. The mayor also urges to increase the number of public recycling containers from 600 to 1,000 pieces by the year 2014.

Challenging every New Yorkers efforts to be ‘green’

It’s usually easier said than done. That is why New Yorkers will be greatly challenged with the kind of commitment that the city expects from each one of them. Of course, fulfilling the exact details to the NYC recycling plan/guide is crucial, as well as providing for it the right execution. This will certainly be NYC’s biggest challenge yet.

More economical plans for NYC’s recycling programs

The city of New York is also planning on testing a few new machineries that specializes on creating renewable energy. New equipment will be tried out to see if they can start breaking down the city’s trash into electricity and heat. Now, a prospective recycling installation such as this will help keep out 135,000 tons worth of garbage out of the city, annually (according to recycling statistics).

via: NYTimes. com

95% of Trash Recycled in 2040 – Austin, Texas

Friday, January 6th, 2012
Composting – A Zero Waste Resolution
A zero waste resolution is possible, especially if you carry out a composting plan. Composting has been long used, and has been a remarkable environmental advancement. It is a natural process that not only helps convert organic refuse into a reusable resource. It’s a process that also encourages less consumption and collection of garbage. How’s that for an ecological and sustainable breakthrough!
The city of Austin initiates a promising waste plan
Austin city has a goal, and that is to recycle 95% of its garbage by the year 2040. But how can they push through with this kind of strategy? Well, the town will be putting into operation a waste plan that is completely retuned. They will be using only the latest approaches in garbage cutback, recycling, and composting. Moreover, this will also help find out which techniques will both help on producing fewer garbage and cutting on costs.
Understanding Austin’s master plan
According to Austin Resource Recovery’s master plan, Austin city is hoping to execute their plan of removing all wastes from landfills; and aspiring to return all of these ‘refuse’ into something that can be reused again. Bob Gedert, Director of Austin Resource Recovery, even believes that the build-up of wastes in landfills today should be given a ‘second life’, as these are materials that may still have some significance later on. But other than this view, Resource Recovery’s plan is also pushing through reaching targets in the form of a ‘set waste diversion’. They intend to get this scheme going every five years, which already started in 2010 (already started a 35% diversion). This will be further endorsed by using recycling facilities more often. Supplementary compost collector units will also be provided, and will be made available to Austin’s citizens by the year 2015.
Making a commitment is everything!
Austin city is a good example of a unified municipality. If they can execute plans that their town will strongly benefit from, so can we. And all it takes is a little commitment from each and everyone. A project as big as Austin’s is in it for the long run. But knowing how to recycle and to compost also has an underlying factor. Waste reduction should be taught properly. If your city wants its projects to work smoothly, it should also be able to provide the materials needed (learning materials should always be accessible and convenient for its citizens to acquire). Learning about which items are recyclable or compostable will greatly help in reducing landfill build-up and more.
Waste management can start anywhere and by anyone
With a concise effort from every individual, a zero waste plan can be done successfully. Several business establishments such as restaurants, and other institutions such as school and parks are already helping manage their own collection of garbage. Composting is even practiced in several teaching facilities today, as students and teachers have been making it a part of their daily routine to recycle and compost whatever they could. Believe it or not, cafeteria leftovers and used papers are being fed to compost worms (the process of vermicomposting), to help produce a nutrient rich fertilizer and soilamendment.

Composting – A Zero Waste Resolution

A zero waste resolution is possible, especially if you carry out a composting plan. Composting has been long used, and has been a remarkable environmental advancement. It is a natural process that not only helps convert organic refuse into a reusable resource. It’s a process that also encourages less consumption and collection of garbage. How’s that for an ecological and sustainable breakthrough!

The city of Austin initiates a promising waste plan

Austin city has a goal, and that is to recycle 95% of its garbage by the year 2040. But how can they push through with this kind of strategy? Well, the town will be putting into operation a waste plan that is completely retuned. They will be using only the latest approaches in garbage cutback, recycling, and composting. Moreover, this will also help find out which techniques will both help on producing fewer garbage and cutting on costs.

Understanding Austin’s master plan

According to Austin Resource Recovery’s master plan, Austin city is hoping to execute their plan of removing all wastes from landfills; and aspiring to return all of these ‘refuse’ into something that can be reused again. Bob Gedert, Director of Austin Resource Recovery, even believes that the build-up of wastes in landfills today should be given a ‘second life’, as these are materials that may still have some significance later on. But other than this view, Resource Recovery’s plan is also pushing through reaching targets in the form of a ‘set waste diversion’. They intend to get this scheme going every five years, which already started in 2010 (already started a 35% diversion). This will be further endorsed by using recycling facilities more often. Supplementary compost collector units will also be provided, and will be made available to Austin’s citizens by the year 2015.

Making a commitment is everything!

Austin city is a good example of a unified municipality. If they can execute plans that their town will strongly benefit from, so can we. And all it takes is a little commitment from each and everyone. A project as big as Austin’s is in it for the long run. But knowing how to recycle and to compost also has an underlying factor. Waste reduction should be taught properly. If your city wants its projects to work smoothly, it should also be able to provide the materials needed (learning materials should always be accessible and convenient for its citizens to acquire). Learning about which items are recyclable or compostable will greatly help in reducing landfill build-up and more.

Waste management can start anywhere and by anyone

With a concise effort from every individual, a zero waste plan can be done successfully. Several business establishments such as restaurants, and other institutions such as school and parks are already helping manage their own collection of garbage. Composting is even practiced in several teaching facilities today, as students and teachers have been making it a part of their daily routine to recycle and compost whatever they could. Believe it or not, cafeteria leftovers and used papers are being fed to compost worms (the process of vermicomposting), to help produce a nutrient rich fertilizer and soil amendment.

via: Harvestpower.com