Posts Tagged ‘vermicompost bin’

Starting your own Wood Worm Bin Construction

Sunday, July 11th, 2010
There are a variety of readily available plastic worm bins in the market today; and worm containers made out of wood are also amongst gardeners’ choices. But by choosing to build your own, you not only experience the craft of making it, you also get to assemble a worm bin that will set you apart from all the commercially made containers in the market. Create a bin for your worms that’s specifically designed for worm composting. There are plenty of facts about vermicomposting that you may look up online, to further understand the real need for worm containers. And starting your own wood worm bin construction at home can be also done at your own convenience.
Before proceeding to your wood worm bin construction, consider these first: bin size preference, materials to use, and a good ventilation and drainage system. Wood is a good material, as it provides better aeration and insulation, as compared to plastic-made containers.
Step 1: Plan-out your desired size for the worm bin. You can modify the worm bin size as you base it on the quantity of organic materials that you aim to compost. To calculate for that, you’ll need 1 square foot of surface area (for your bin) for every pound of waste that is put in and casted. Homemade worm bins should be no deeper than 8 to 12 inches, as it enables the composting worms to function properly. This will allow them to feed on organic materials on the soil surface and to take advantage of aeration. Worms climb to top of bin, so make sure that the bin’s dimensions encourages this especially after they’ve deposited their castings.
Step 2: Gather your materials for your worm composting bin. You’ll need a power saw or hand saw, a hammer, a pencil and measuring tape, some glue, a square, a drill (with 1/4″ and 3/32″ bits), and some sandpaper. Also use gears for your eyes, ear and body.  You can build your bin by using a 4-by-8 foot of sheet plywood. Your plywood should also be in exterior grade and should be non-treated (as chemicals may eventually cause a leak inside the bin). You can use this for the bin’s base, lid, sides and ends. You can start assembling all the pieces together by putting glue on it first, before securing it with nails.
Dimensions for the materials:
Bin – 16 in.(H) x 2ft(W) x 4ft(L)
Base and Lid – 2-by-4ft; with sides that measure 16in.x4 ft; ends 16in.x24 in.
Cleats – two-by-fours (screw these into the interior corners of the sides and ends)
Step 3: To create an effective ventilation and aeration system for your red worms, you must drill about 12 (3/8-in.) holes on the bin’s base. Always monitor your bin to check for sufficient aeration even after you’ve placed your bedding, wastes and your worms. For your wood worm bin construction, elevate your bin by giving it legs or placing it on top of bricks. Also make sure to place a tray underneath for collecting leachate drips from the bin. And that’s it!
GardenWorms.com recommends the Con o Worms
For just $119, let Con o Worms provide you with an instant way of turning your kitchen scraps into valuable garden compost. It’s quick, odorless and space efficient; and it’s ideal for new timers!
To know more about the product, check the Con o Worms here.

wooden worm bin constructionThere are a variety of readily available plastic worm bins in the market today; and worm containers made out of wood are also amongst gardeners’ choices. But by choosing to build your own, you not only experience the craft of making it, you also get to assemble a worm bin that will set you apart from all the commercially made containers in the market. Create a bin for your worms that’s specifically designed for worm composting. There are plenty of facts about vermicomposting that you may look up online, to further understand the real need for worm containers. And starting your own wood worm bin construction at home can be also done at your own convenience.

Before proceeding to your wood worm bin construction, consider these first: bin size preference, materials to use, and a good ventilation and drainage system. Wood is a good material, as it provides better aeration and insulation, as compared to plastic-made containers.

Step 1: Plan-out your desired size for the worm bin. You can modify the worm bin size as you base it on the quantity of organic materials that you aim to compost. To calculate for that, you’ll need 1 square foot of surface area (for your bin) for every pound of waste that is put in and casted. Homemade worm bins should be no deeper than 8 to 12 inches, as it enables the composting worms to function properly. This will allow them to feed on organic materials on the soil surface and to take advantage of aeration. Worms climb to top of bin, so make sure that the bin’s dimensions encourages this especially after they’ve deposited their castings.

Step 2: Gather your materials for your worm composting bin. You’ll need a power saw or hand saw, a hammer, a pencil and measuring tape, some glue, a square, a drill (with 1/4″ and 3/32″ bits), and some sandpaper. Also use gears for your eyes, ear and body.  You can build your bin by using a 4-by-8 foot of sheet plywood. Your plywood should also be in exterior grade and should be non-treated (as chemicals may eventually cause a leak inside the bin). You can use this for the bin’s base, lid, sides and ends. You can start assembling all the pieces together by putting glue on it first, before securing it with nails.

Dimensions for the materials:

  • Bin – 16 in.(H) x 2ft(W) x 4ft(L)
  • Base and Lid – 2-by-4ft; with sides that measure 16in.x4 ft; ends 16in.x24 in.
  • Cleats – two-by-fours (screw these into the interior corners of the sides and ends)

Step 3: To create an effective ventilation and aeration system for your red worms, you must drill about 12 (3/8-in.) holes on the bin’s base. Always monitor your bin to check for sufficient aeration even after you’ve placed your bedding, wastes and your worms. For your wood worm bin construction, elevate your bin by giving it legs or placing it on top of bricks. Also make sure to place a tray underneath for collecting leachate drips from the bin. And that’s it!

GardenWorms.com recommends the Can-o-Worms

can-o-worms

For just $119, let Can-o-Worms provide you with an instant way of turning your kitchen scraps into valuable garden compost. It’s quick, odorless and space efficient; and it’s ideal for new timers!

To know more about the product, check the Can-o-Worms here.

How to Build a Vermicompost Bin

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

binVermicomposting is never complete without the composting bin.  This is where the Red Wiggler worms (recommended composting worms) will stay and produce that dark, nutrient-rich soil amendment for your plants.

You can buy commercial vermicompost bin like the Worm Factory, but if you have more spared time, you can do it yourself.  Just prepare a clean container which is around 6 inches in depth and the size would depend on how many worms you will place in it.  The color as much as possible should be dark.  Also prepare newspapers, magazines cardboards and grass cuttings if you have.

First, drill holes in the container. You can have around 20 -30 quarter inch holes at the bottom.  You can also do this at the sides of the bin.  This will serve as the drainage and at the same time ventilation system of the whole bin.  Red Wiggler worms need air and oxygen so holes are really important.

Once set, have the newspapers and magazines cut into strips.  Soak them into water to make the bedding moist but don’t allow it to be too soggy.  You can then place those shredded newspapers in the bin.  You may also add a cardboard at the top once you settle the newspapers because composting worms love to feed on moist cardboards.

Note that you are to situate the vermicompost bin in a cool area.  You may have it in your garage, basement, under the kitchen sink or anywhere shady.  Do not expose the worms to too much light and a temperature of 50-85 degrees Fahrenheit is advisable.

That’s all that you have to do.  A vermicompost bin is not hard to make; it’s not also expensive so might as well do it rather than buy it.

You might also be interested in our other post about :

How to Make a Composter or a Compost Tumbler