Posts Tagged ‘Worm Composting’

Control Crop Disease through Worm Composting

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

The process of worm composting has already been tried and tested. And the very by-product of it, which is referred to as worm castings, has been extensively used as a nutrient packed plant fertilizer and as a soil amendment. But other than its other effective functions, any red worms compost can also be used as an alternative medium for managing crop disease/s.

Worm composting and the creation of worm castings
Organic scraps such as a selection of leftovers from the kitchen or from the yard can be used as bedding material, and as a food source for the worms and live microbes. Composting with worms is basically a natural process that aids in converting organic refuse into a finer and richer garden resource. The worm castings, after being excreted by the worms will look just like the soil from the ground. It will come out as an odorless substance that is earthy in shade, and is crumbly in consistency.
Worm compost can also help fight off crop diseases
Worm compost isn’t just your alternative fertilizer or soil enhancer. It has also been discovered to have the capability to avert a certain pathogen that plagues most plants. Now according to the Western Farm Press, the researchers of Cornell University were able to prove this when they tested on different worm groups.
How gathering valuable research materials helps make a difference
Research that has been gathered earlier by Allison Jack (a Ph.D. student) from Professor Eric Nelson’s research group in the Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, discovered that the live microorganisms in the red wigglers castings were able to inhabit the exterior portions of the seed. An organic material is discharged, which then gives the seed the protection that it needs from the disease. The substance that is actually released will form an obstruction with the chemical amid the pathogen and the host.
Worm compost can also be a brutal substance
Worm compost can only post brutal for use when it is applied on plants that are potentially or presently weighed down by pathogens. Eric Carr, a master’s student from Professor Nelson’s test center, has been studying the other ‘suppressive qualities’ of a worm’s manure. Worm castings are tested on a certain pathogen and its different parts of its life cycle. Mr. Carr is constantly finding ways on how newly grown seedlings can be protected with just an application of worm compost, especially when pathogen spores attack.
The challenges that come with using worm compost
There are different kinds of compost used, for which thousands of microorganisms are also involved (particularly in worm composting). But only a few of these can help control specific crop diseases. So determining which ones are effective actually poses as a big challenge for scientists. But this has been eventually resolved through Allison Jack’s collaboration with Worm Power. Worm Power, an Avon, N.Y., company managed by Tom Herlihy, produces 2.5 million pounds of worm compost per annum. Since there is control and consistency in the production of compost, the quality and the composition of the vermicompost will fit well to Jack’s data gathering.

The process of worm composting has already been tried and tested. And the very by-product of it, which is referred to as worm castings, has been extensively used as a nutrient packed plant fertilizer and as a soil amendment. But other than its other effective functions, any red worms compost can also be used as an alternative medium for managing crop disease/s.

Worm composting and the creation of worm castings

Organic scraps such as a selection of leftovers from the kitchen or from the yard can be used as bedding material, and as a food source for the worms and live microbes. Composting with worms is basically a natural process that aids in converting organic refuse into a finer and richer garden resource. The worm castings, after being excreted by the worms will look just like the soil from the ground. It will come out as an odorless substance that is earthy in shade, and is crumbly in consistency.

Worm compost can also help fight off crop diseases

Worm compost isn’t just your alternative fertilizer or soil enhancer. It has also been discovered to have the capability to avert a certain pathogen that plagues most plants. Now according to the Western Farm Press, the researchers of Cornell University were able to prove this when they tested on different worm groups.

How gathering valuable research materials helps make a difference

Research that has been gathered earlier by Allison Jack (a Ph.D. student) from Professor Eric Nelson’s research group in the Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, discovered that the live microorganisms in the red wigglers castings were able to inhabit the exterior portions of the seed. An organic material is discharged, which then gives the seed the protection that it needs from the disease. The substance that is actually released will form an obstruction with the chemical amid the pathogen and the host.

Worm compost can also be a brutal substance

Worm compost can only post brutal for use when it is applied on plants that are potentially or presently weighed down by pathogens. Eric Carr, a master’s student from Professor Nelson’s test center, has been studying the other ‘suppressive qualities’ of a worm’s manure. Worm castings are tested on a certain pathogen and its different parts of its life cycle. Mr. Carr is constantly finding ways on how newly grown seedlings can be protected with just an application of worm compost, especially when pathogen spores attack.

The challenges that come with using worm compost

There are different kinds of compost used, for which thousands of microorganisms are also involved (particularly in worm composting). But only a few of these can help control specific crop diseases. So determining which ones are effective actually poses as a big challenge for scientists. But this has been eventually resolved through Allison Jack’s collaboration with Worm Power. Worm Power, an Avon, N.Y., company managed by Tom Herlihy, produces 2.5 million pounds of worm compost per annum. Since there is control and consistency in the production of compost, the quality and the composition of the vermicompost will fit well to Jack’s data gathering.

via: Westerfarmpress.com

Airport Worm Composting – The first of its kind!

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

The idea of getting into worm Composting before was somewhat unpleasant. And it gave an impression that most people wouldn’t want to visualize for long. But after several attempts at it, it soon became a very popular venture. From simple individuals to expert gardeners, vermicomposting has then evolved. If you can believe it, the use of worms for composting is now being used in Charlotte/Douglas International Airport today. You can find out more from this page on how this particular airport uses compost worms in converting their daily organic garbage into a nutritious resource.

An airports junk can be a compost worm’s treasure!
Who would’ve thought that an airport such as Charlotte/Douglas International Airport would get into worm composting? Then again, it’s one of the best ways to eliminate daily accumulations of trash without having to pollute the ecosystem further. Individuals, and even bigger establishments have already gone into the act of composting. So it’s just about time for a much bigger entity like an airport to get into it as well. It is in fact, a remarkable way of helping reduce organic trash from landfill build-ups. With composting, there will be no more burning of trash (less air pollution), less trash on landfills (unnecessary leaks on both grounds and water bodies will be avoided); and there will be more supply of natural fertilizer that can be used for gardens and farms.
Worm Composting – The way Charlotte/Douglas International Airport does it!
The Charlotte/Douglas International Airport generates plenty of garbage in a day, a lot of which comes directly from daily travelers. And with this in mind, the said airport has decided to install a worm-based composting system, which also comes in conjunction with the new $1.1 million recycling center. With the assistance of hundreds of pounds of red worms, the costs on garbage collections and disposals will be trimmed down. These compost worms will also be able to eat off of two tons of waste on a day-to-day basis, which will then help keep up with the ‘eventual airport expansion’. So not only will these worms help the airport to be more ecological, these tiny creatures will also be able to help the airport to save about $1 million in waste disposal expenses (in a 5-year projection).
What the airport can do with the worm by-product
Compost worms (with the assistance of live microbes), after they’ve gorged on plenty of organic refuse, will gradually excrete a nutrient packed by-product. The consumption and the conversion of these natural wastes will eventually turn up into finished compost (also known as worm castings, worm poop or humus). And with this remarkable conversion, the airport has designed a plan to use this rich by-product as an organic fertilizer for their 6,000 acres of land. They are also looking into packing and selling the compost remains to others who may have the need for it.
The airport’s scheme for composting their garbage
The airport plans to have their garbage fed into their pre-composter first (1,600 sq. ft.), to have the scraps rundown into smaller parts. And as soon as these are broken down and filtered of odors (airport remains such as toilet papers, leftover food, etc.), these will then be stocked into the worm composting system.

The idea of getting into worm Composting before was somewhat unpleasant. And it gave an impression that most people wouldn’t want to visualize for long. But after several attempts at it, it soon became a very popular venture. From simple individuals to expert gardeners, vermicomposting has then evolved. If you can believe it, the use of worms for composting is now being used in Charlotte/Douglas International Airport today. You can find out more from this page on how this particular airport uses compost worms in converting their daily organic garbage into a nutritious resource.

An airports junk can be a compost worm’s treasure!

Who would’ve thought that an airport such as Charlotte/Douglas International Airport would get into worm composting? Then again, it’s one of the best ways to eliminate daily accumulations of trash without having to pollute the ecosystem further. Individuals, and even bigger establishments have already gone into the act of composting. So it’s just about time for a much bigger entity like an airport to get into it as well. It is in fact, a remarkable way of helping reduce organic trash from landfill build-ups. With composting, there will be no more burning of trash (less air pollution), less trash on landfills (unnecessary leaks on both grounds and water bodies will be avoided); and there will be more supply of natural fertilizer that can be used for gardens and farms.

Worm Composting – The way Charlotte/Douglas International Airport does it!

The Charlotte/Douglas International Airport generates plenty of garbage in a day, a lot of which comes directly from daily travelers. And with this in mind, the said airport has decided to install a worm-based composting system, which also comes in conjunction with the new $1.1 million recycling center. With the assistance of hundreds of pounds of red worms, the costs on garbage collections and disposals will be trimmed down. These compost worms will also be able to eat off of two tons of waste on a day-to-day basis, which will then help keep up with the ‘eventual airport expansion’. So not only will these worms help the airport to be more ecological, these tiny creatures will also be able to help the airport to save about $1 million in waste disposal expenses (in a 5-year projection).

What the airport can do with the worm by-product

Compost worms (with the assistance of live microbes), after they’ve gorged on plenty of organic refuse, will gradually excrete a nutrient packed by-product. The consumption and the conversion of these natural wastes will eventually turn up into finished compost (also known as worm castings, worm poop or humus). And with this remarkable conversion, the airport has designed a plan to use this rich by-product as an organic fertilizer for their 6,000 acres of land. They are also looking into packing and selling the compost remains to others who may have the need for it.

The airport’s scheme for composting their garbage

The airport plans to have their garbage fed into their pre-composter first (1,600 sq. ft.), to have the scraps rundown into smaller parts. And as soon as these are broken down and filtered of odors (airport remains such as toilet papers, leftover food, etc.), these will then be stocked into the worm composting system.

via: Triplepundit.com

Worm Composting: The perks to vermicomposting on campus

Sunday, August 28th, 2011
Worm Composting: The perks to vermicomposting on campus
Composting has grown into an industry, and has sparked up several interesting projects all over the world including the participation of schools. Now, a lot of school professionals along with their students have already taken interest on both campus gardening and composting; and have certainly reaped countless rewards from this specific venture. But the one thing that stands out is vermicomposting. Vermicomposting is a natural process that involves the use of worms. Not only do worms eat off of organic wastes, they are also capable of producing a nontoxic nutrient-packed compost like no other.
Activities that can be encouraged out of worm composting
There are several ways to using worms for composting on campus. For one, you can have the worms observed in a science class, wherein the whole compost system can be analyzed (life cycle of worms, type of compost worms used, the presence of microbial activity, etc.). But the best way to use these compost worms is to have a specific goal in mind. Many staff and students are already into vermicomposting to help reduce their fill of organic garbage on school grounds; and are also creating their own organic gardens along with the cause. They’re also making sure that they supplement it with an organic fertilizer. These driven individuals make sure that recycling and composting go hand in hand at all times; and the result of this produces a free garden resource called ‘worm castings’.
Space should not be a restriction when vermicomposting
Vermicomposting isn’t just restricted for home or outdoor use. Any staff member or student can do this in the comforts of their own offices or dorm/residence halls. Small-scale vermicomposting can also be done at campus centers and cafeterias (where food scraps are abundant). The space-restricted only needs a compact composter, some organic bedding materials, an organic food source, and some feisty worms (you can buy a worm supply from a nearby garden center, bait shop, or online worm farm) to start off with the process. It’s that convenient to have around.
Compost Bins, Bedding, Organic Food, and Compost Worms
Now, the best tip that you can get out of worm composting is to acquire a small compost bin, and some moist paper shreds. You can also add in some dry foliage when you see some on school grounds. Other than that, use used paper. It’s an ample resource since it’s a staple in school. So you definitely won’t run out of materials that can bed and feed your worms.
The advantages to worm composting on school grounds
Through worm composting, organic garbage that are being dumped on landfills are certainly reduced to a number. Another thing that gets reduced from the school’s expenses would be the cost of having to remove and dispose wastes from the area. Being able to produce worm compost also lessens the university’s costs on having to purchase fertilizers for their organic gardens and irrigation systems. The whole idea of using worms and the sustainable issues that gets solved by this process also helps educate both students and professionals. Vermicomposting on campus not only saves money. These soil creatures also help save the environment.

Composting has grown into an industry, and has sparked up several interesting projects all over the world including the participation of schools. Now, a lot of school professionals along with their students have already taken interest on both campus gardening and composting; and have certainly reaped countless rewards from this specific venture. But the one thing that stands out is vermicomposting. Vermicomposting is a natural process that involves the use of worms. Not only do worms eat off of organic wastes, they are also capable of producing a nontoxic nutrient-packed compost like no other.

Activities that can be encouraged out of worm composting

There are several ways to using worms for composting on campus. For one, you can have the worms observed in a science class, wherein the whole compost system can be analyzed (life cycle of worms, type of compost worms used, the presence of microbial activity, etc.). But the best way to use these compost worms is to have a specific goal in mind. Many staff and students are already into vermicomposting to help reduce their fill of organic garbage on school grounds; and are also creating their own organic gardens along with the cause. They’re also making sure that they supplement it with an organic fertilizer. These driven individuals make sure that recycling and composting go hand in hand at all times; and the result of this produces a free garden resource called ‘worm castings’.

Space should not be a restriction when vermicomposting

Vermicomposting isn’t just restricted for home or outdoor use. Any staff member or student can do this in the comforts of their own offices or dorm/residence halls. Small-scale vermicomposting can also be done at campus centers and cafeterias (where food scraps are abundant). The space-restricted only needs a compact composter, some organic bedding materials, an organic food source, and some feisty worms (you can buy a worm supply from a nearby garden center, bait shop, or online worm farm) to start off with the process. It’s that convenient to have around.

Compost Bins, Bedding, Organic Food, and Compost Worms

Now, the best tip that you can get out of worm composting is to acquire a small compost bin, and some moist paper shreds. You can also add in some dry foliage when you see some on school grounds. Other than that, use used paper. It’s an ample resource since it’s a staple in school. So you definitely won’t run out of materials that can bed and feed your worms.

The advantages to worm composting on school grounds

Through worm composting, organic garbage that are being dumped on landfills are certainly reduced to a number. Another thing that gets reduced from the school’s expenses would be the cost of having to remove and dispose wastes from the area. Being able to produce worm compost also lessens the university’s costs on having to purchase fertilizers for their organic gardens and irrigation systems. The whole idea of using worms and the sustainable issues that gets solved by this process also helps educate both students and professionals. Vermicomposting on campus not only saves money. These soil creatures also help save the environment.

Compost News from around the Country

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

At Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we believe that educating our readers about compost and worm composting is one of the most important services we offer. In that vein, it’s important to keep in mind the communities, companies and people that are implementing compost plans into their daily lives and practices. Here are a few of the recent stories covering compost news from around the country:

Saugus compost site rules begin Saturday

By David Liscio / The Daily Item

SAUGUS , MA- The town reopens its recycling drop-off site on Saturday where residents can rid themselves of paper, cardboard, bottles, cans and glass containers.

The town’s compost center behind the Department of Public Works barn at 515 Main St. will also reopen. The compost site hours are Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. A seasonal fee of $25 to use the compost facility must be paid by check or money order. No cash will be accepted and no exceptions will be made, town officials said. Read entire article.

GrowNY Compost Project

On March 5, 2011 GrowNYC will begin a 4-month pilot program to expand current food scrap collections from NYC households at select Greenmarkets. Shoppers can drop off fruit and vegetable scraps to be transported to a compost facility where they will become a fertile soil amendment for local farming projects and other uses. This program complements the existing, ongoing Greenmarket food scrap collections conducted by our community partners, Lower East Side Ecology Center (Union Square), Western Queens Compost Initiative (Sunnyside, Jackson Heights) and the Ft. Greene Compost Project.  Read entire article.

Don’t live in either of these communities? What is your neighborhood doing to make composting part of your community? Reach out to your Parks and Recreations Department or Public Waste Department and see what you can do about making public composting part of your region.

Time to Learn! Worm Composting Courses around the Country

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

As people around the country become more eco-minded and look to ways they can make a difference in their local community, worm composting continues to grow in popularity and application. Composting is much easier thanUncle Jims Worm Farm most people think it is and the following FREE courses from around the country not only educate as to the importance of worm composting, but give the detailed steps attendees need to begin worm composting in your home, apartment or neighborhood.

Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm is proud to provide updated news sources regarding composting seminars, classes and meetings from around the world to our readers. Check back weekly for updated compost events from around the web.

From WBNG News in Binghamton, NY

LIBRARY TO HOLD COMPOSTING PROGRAM FOR YOUTH

Binghamton, NY (WBNG BInghamton) The Broome County Public Library invites youth to participate in The Green Scene, a new monthly program centered on fun environmentally-friendly activities.

On Thursday, March 31, 6:00pm, the activity will be Worm Composting—master composters will teach about composting, and they’ll help set up a compost bin for the Library!

From the SGV Tribune in California

Free gardening workshop offered to Rowland Heights Residents

Attend a free beginner Smart Gardening Workshop from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. March 19 at Schabarum Regional Park, 17250 E. Colima Road. Learn about backyard composting, worm composting, grass recycling, water-wise gardening and fire-wise gardening.

From Breaking New Grounds in Louisville, KY

Breaking New Grounds, Amazing Green Planet Offer Free Composting Workshop Saturday, March 26

March 18, 2011, Louisville, Ky. – Breaking New Grounds and Amazing Green Planet will partner March 26 to raise awareness about composting and raise funds for the local nonprofit dedicated to economic development through sustainable urban agriculture.

A composting workshop, led by Breaking New Grounds board member Mark Forman, is scheduled for 11 AM on March 26 at Amazing Green Planet in Westport Village, 1301 Herr Lane. Attendees will learn a simple method for composting at home using food-grade 5-gallon buckets, along with some easy-to-follow guidelines for turning their waste into new soil. In addition, Amazing Green Planet will donate 10 percent of the weekend’s sales of all composting equipment to Breaking New Grounds.

No events in your neighborhood this time? If you’re ready to begin worm composting, check out our HOW TO guide here: Begin Composting with Uncle Jims Worm Farm.

Common Problems and Solutions in Worm Breeding

Saturday, December 18th, 2010

If you’ve encountered problems when it comes to your worm’s bin (particularly if you’re raising red worms or raising European nightcrawlers), then you can be assured that there are common problems and solutions  in worm breeding that you can learn and rely on. You may encounter some symptoms, so it’s best to know how to deal with these by knowing what caused the particular problem; and then have these solved at the best possible way.

While you’re breeding composting worms (either red wiggler worms or european nightcrawlers), have you ever experienced them crawl out of the bin? Chances are, your worms may be starting to get sick, slowly dying, or starting to attract unwanted pests into the composter. A harsh environment may lead to your worms eventual demise, so know how to care for them the right way.

We all know that everything that is extreme isn’t always that good. So whether you’re using Can-O-Worms and Red Worms for Vermicomposting, or any type of composter, you should take note of the following oversight when it comes to this type of composting:

  • Your worms breathe through their moist skin so you definitely can’t leave your worm composting bin too dry, too wet or too acidic. Leaving the bin too dry will post harmful to your worms, and will eventually lead to their death. Leaving the bin too wet on the other hand can lead to your worms drowning from this. So try to achieve a bedding that has the consistency of a wrung-out sponge. Apart form that, you can’t also leave your worms in a very acidic bin, as they can burn from this.
  • When you’re raising worms, you should also know that you can’t overfeed them nor underfeed them. It’s best that you feed them enough. Now if they happen to ignore much of the food inside the bin, then this can lead to leftover food, which can then lead to unwanted pest visits (a liking for fruit flies in particular). This goes the same with feeding them organic wastes that are bad for them (spoilt food can also cause odor build-up). One good thing that you can do to eliminate odors and pest visits is to bury their food with bedding materials. Avoid feeding them foodstuff that are spicy, salty, oily, citrusy, or anything that has dairy, meat, seafood, or poultry in them.
  • You should also know the right and wrong kinds of food to feed your red wigglers and/or nightcrawlers. Raw or decomposing organic materials (can be obtained from your kitchen or garden) can be given to them just as long as these are: Vegetable or fruits peels, crushed egg shells (also helps balance the pH level inside the worm bin), coffee grounds, used tea bags, grass clippings, strips of newspaper or cardboard, dried leaves, and animal manure (only the ones from plant-eating animals).
  • You also shouldn’t bother them. Red worms or nightcrawlers like to be untouched, especially when they’re busy doing their everyday things. They also like being in dark surroundings, as they can be very sensitive to bright lights. You can only open their bin when it’s time to replenish the bin of new food and bedding, and when harvesting their castings.

When it comes to common problems and solutions  in worm breeding, also take note that worms need a bin with holes (regularly check if there are any blockage), so that air can freely flow in and out of it (worms also need oxygen to be able to live). Much like their need for warmth as well (room temperature in anywhere that they are located in is ideal).

GardenWorms.com recommends the Can-O-Worms

If you want to get a hold of the lowest-priced Can-O-Worms on the internet, then you’ve come to the right place! Our quick, odorless, and space-efficient stackable composter can help breakdown regularly generated wastes from your kitchen and garden. Get your own ‘Black Gold’ produce in just a matter of time. Get yours today, and experience a better vermicomposting process!

To know more about the product, check the Can-O-Worms here.

If you’ve encountered problems when it comes to your worm’s bin (particularly if you’re raising red worms or raising European nightcrawlers), then you can be assured that there are common problems and solutions  in worm breeding that you can learn and rely on. You may encounter some symptoms, so it’s best to know how to deal with these by knowing what caused the particular problem; and then have these solved at the best possible way.

While you’re breeding composting worms (either red wiggler worms or european nightcrawlers), have you ever experienced them crawl out of the bin? Chances are, your worms may be starting to get sick, slowly dying, or starting to attract unwanted pests into the composter. A harsh environment may lead to your worms eventual demise, so know how to care for them the right way.

We all know that everything that is extreme isn’t always that good. So whether you’re using Can-O-Worms and Red Worms for Vermicomposting, or any type of composter, you should take note of the following oversight when it comes to this type of composting:

•    Your worms breathe through their moist skin so you definitely can’t leave your worm composting bin too dry, too wet or too acidic. Leaving the bin too dry will post harmful to your worms, and will eventually lead to their death. Leaving the bin too wet on the other hand can lead to your worms drowning from this. So try to achieve a bedding that has the consistency of a wrung-out sponge. Apart form that, you can’t also leave your worms in a very acidic bin, as they can burn from this.
•    When you’re raising worms, you should also know that you can’t overfeed them nor underfeed them. It’s best that you feed them enough. Now if they happen to ignore much of the food inside the bin, then this can lead to leftover food, which can then lead to unwanted pest visits (a liking for fruit flies in particular). This goes the same with feeding them organic wastes that are bad for them (spoilt food can also cause odor build-up). One good thing that you can do to eliminate odors and pest visits is to bury their food with bedding materials.
o    Avoid feeding them foodstuff that are spicy, salty, oily, citrusy, or anything that has dairy, meat, seafood, or poultry in them.
•    You should also know the right and wrong kinds of food to feed your red wigglers and/or nightcrawlers. Raw or decomposing organic materials (can be obtained from your kitchen or garden) can be given to them just as long as these are:
o    Vegetable or fruits peels, crushed egg shells (also helps balance the pH level inside the worm bin), coffee grounds, used tea bags, grass clippings, strips of newspaper or cardboard, dried leaves, and animal manure (only the ones from plant-eating animals).
•    You also shouldn’t bother them. Red worms or nightcrawlers like to be untouched, especially when they’re busy doing their everyday things. They also like being in dark surroundings, as they can be very sensitive to bright lights. You can only open their bin when it’s time to replenish the bin of new food and bedding, and when harvesting their castings.

When it comes to common problems and solutions  in worm breeding, also take note that worms need a bin with holes (regularly check if there are any blockage), so that air can freely flow in and out of it (worms also need oxygen to be able to live). Much like their need for warmth as well (room temperature in anywhere that they are located in is ideal).

Uncle Jim’s recommends the Can-O-Worms

If you want to get a hold of the lowest-priced Can-O-Worms on the internet, then you’ve come to the right place! Our quick, odorless, and space-efficient stackable composter can help breakdown regularly generated wastes from your kitchen and garden. Get your own ‘Black Gold’ produce in just a matter of time. Get yours today, and experience a better vermicomposting process!

To know more about the product, check the Can-O-Worms here.

Live Worms Familiarization

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Knowing that there are a lot of available live worms or live earthworms is something good. You know that you are being provided with the kind of information that will help you with your organic composting or profit-making needs. Earthworms especially the nightcrawler or red worm type can be sold to commercial breeders (their castings can also be sold separately), dealers (those who sell to aquariums and laboratories), and to fishermen (can be used as bait for fish). Not only that, you also get a chance to provide exotic pets (especially if you have some birds, reptiles, and amphibians for pets) with some live worm feed.

Earthworms, whether you use them as live fishing worms or live bait worms can be obtained from people who owns fish. They are also likely to have a bunch of these if they’re into fishing for a living (it will also be a good to idea to look for fish clubs or well-known fish shops in close proximity to your area). Other than that, you can also get a hold of these worms through specialty stores (you may check gardening and worm composting stores online that offer live worm cultures like GardenWorms.com). But if you want to get them inexpensively and right away (you’ll no longer need to buy out for a new batch of worms every time you run out of stock), then you can always opt into breeding and raising your own worms.

Now, if you do decide to raise and breed your own red wiggler worms or European nightcrawlers, then you should know the following interesting information about earthworms in general:

  • Whether you use these earthworm types as live bait, live worm food, or for composting, you should know that they  are born without any eyes, ears, and lungs. But despite of not having all the other essential organs, earthworms are able to live by sensing the vibrations on the ground, and sense light from their surroundings. They might not have lungs, but they are able to breathe through their moist skin (thus their need to always be kept in moist environments, to keep them from drying out).
  • Earthworms, whether you buy worms or breed them on your own, will always need some essentials to be able to thrive comfortably. They will always have the need for food to eat, the right kind of temperature to be in (room temperature is the ideal one), some moisture (especially in the bin they are living in), and air to breathe (oxygen is an essential to a worms health).
  • These cold-blooded composting worms (there are a lot of live worms for sale in this type of selection) such as red worms and nightcrawlers are able to produce high-quality worm castings out of all the previously fed decomposing organic materials. Castings from worms can be instantly used as an organic fertilizer for your plants and soil.
  • Worms are also hermaphrodites, but they will still still need another worm (should be the same kind as them) to be able to mate and reproduce.

Other than these live worms being rich in nutrients, it also happens to be nature’s little helpers, so you can no longer ask for anything more as they’re very versatile.

Uncle Jim’s recommends the Live Worms

We have several good worm packages to choose from. All of our live worms and other worm products are very much sealed securely and safely shipped to you. Get to choose from our 11 products, and experience worm composting fulfillment in just a matter of time! Order your selection/s today!

To know more about the product, check the Live Worms here.

Setting up your Worm Bed

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

If you’re looking for ways on how to set-up your own worm bed, then you’re reading the right material! When it comes to particular things such as how to make a worm bed , all you’ll need to follow is a few essential things. Read on further to get more tips on how to create an organic bed for your compost pals.

It is easy how to build a worm bed. You can start by preparing the materials that you’ll be using. Clearly in this set-up, you’ll need strips of newspapers because you will have to fill (about ½ to ¾ full) your worm bin later on with these stuff. Now it doesn’t end there. You’ll need to soak these strips into some water. You’re going to have to squeeze all the excess water from the newspaper before you can place these inside the worm composter.

Apart from the presoaked newspaper strips (or shreds), you can also put in some soil, as your other worm bedding materials. You may simply sprinkle some on top of the strips. Take note that it’s good to provide your worms with some soil as this material helps them digest their food intake. You should know that worms have no teeth, so they simply can’t chew anything.

Aside from newspaper strips and soil, you can also put in some organic wastes. These organic scraps can come straight from your regularly generated household wastes, and can be in the form of kitchen scraps and garden wastes. Worm bedding can simply be composed of presoaked peat moss, coconut coir, crushed egg shells, and some coffee grounds. Both crushed egg shells and coffee grounds can also serve as a food source for your worms.

But let’s not forget the worm composter that you’ll be using to store your worm bed construction. The size of the worm bin varies so you have to know how many worms are intended to be raised. Other than that, you can start with a medium-sized composter; and start with about a pound worth of worms that can typically amount to more or less 1,200 pieces (you can buy red worms or nightcrawler worms at local bait shops or through worm farms online). You can either choose untreated wood or  a plastic container, that comes with a lid. If you’re adventurous enough, you can even use an old toilet bowl for worm composting.

Also never forget to include in your worm bed plans the holes needed for your composter. Your worm bin should have ventilation and aeration holes drilled all over it. It only means that you’re going to have to drill holes on the top and base area of the bin. Without holes on the composter, the worm bed can potentially get spoiled. The bin does in fact need to be rid of excess water, and be supplied with an ongoing supply of oxygen. Your worms do in fact, need oxygen as well, to be able to breathe and survive. And if the bedding is left too wet, your worms can likely drown from this. So always remember these essentials so that you won’t have to deal with the probable problems sooner or later.

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For only $24.95, get the Kitchen Compost Carrier for its fitting capacity of 2.4 US Gallons. You can simply put it under the sink or anywhere you want. It’s that easy to move and place around. It’s also the perfect tool for all those who are really into composting. With its thick charcoal filter, you no longer have to worry about getting foul smells from your compost, as it keeps the organic scraps odor-free. So get yours today!

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Selling your Vermicomposting worms

Thursday, July 22nd, 2010
If you’re planning on putting up a business out of vermicomposting worms, then now’s the time to do it. You can always breed, sell and make a profit out of red worms, at anytime you want. It’s simple as you won’t have to spend too much on start-up costs. You can always grow your worms and resell them to commercial growers; as well as sell to fishermen who like to make worms for fish bait. You’ll never have to worry about finding your niche in the market, as you’ll definitely never run out of customers too.
To get started on your money-making venture, you must first prepare the following things: red wiggler worms, earthworm bedding, soil, organic waste (worm feed supply), shredded newspaper, plywood, plastic sheeting, and containers. After you’ve gathered all of these materials, you may now proceed with your project.
Start by preparing your worm bedding first. You can either create the bedding or buy it. Either way, your worms will also be able to create more of this when they starting eating and feeding on it. Make sure that your worm bedding is always 12 inches high, as this will be beneficial for your compost pals. Also take note on the material that you’ll be using for your worm bin. If you’re going to use wood, try not purchase anything that’s been treated already. The same goes for plastic containers. The paint and stain (and other chemicals involved) may leak inside your bin; and this will definitely be toxic to your red wigglers. Going back, you should finish your bedding by filling it up with shredded newspaper and some garden soil.
After making your worm bedding, buy yourself at a local bait store, two pounds worth of standard red composting worms. Every two pounds of worms that you buy should be equivalent to a pound’s worth of organic waste in your home (2 pounds of worms = 1 pound of kitchen scraps), as this will serve as feeds for you worms. Your worms will feed on anything just as long as it’s organic. Never feed them meat-based products, dairy products, eggs, or oily foods, as these may harm their diet.
You may also start harvesting on your worm composting pals probably after a month. You can do this by pulling out the worms from the soil (remove about 4 inches of your topsoil first), and by placing them on a piece of plywood, and then eventually transfer them to a clean container. Do the same process until there’s no soil left, and make sure to cover your worm harvest with some plastic sheets, especially when the sun is still up. Also, wear your gloves when harvesting for worms.
You can definitely start selling your worms after this. But start by computing your start-up expense first; and then decide what your profit margin will start at. Afterwards, prepare the price for your worms. There are always sure buyers for your vermicomposting worms, you just always have to know where to find them.
Make a profit out of worm selling, as it’s always been a good investment. And should you want to improve more on how to raise healthy earthworms effectively, or just simply interested on learning about an earthworm’s life cycle, you may visit the Gardenworms.com/blog for more tips on vermicomposting worms.

If you’re planning on putting up a business out of vermicomposting worms, then now’s the time to do it. You can always breed, sell and make a profit out of red worms, at anytime you want. It’s simple as you won’t have to spend too much on start-up costs. You can always grow your worms and resell them to commercial growers; as well as sell to fishermen who like to make worms for fish bait. You’ll never have to worry about finding your niche in the market, as you’ll definitely never run out of customers too.

To get started on your money-making venture, you must first prepare the following things: red wiggler worms, earthworm bedding, soil, organic waste (worm feed supply), shredded newspaper, plywood, plastic sheeting, and containers. After you’ve gathered all of these materials, you may now proceed with your project.

Start by preparing your worm bedding first. You can either create the bedding or buy it. Either way, your worms will also be able to create more of this when they starting eating and feeding on it. Make sure that your worm bedding is always 12 inches high, as this will be beneficial for your compost pals. Also take note on the material that you’ll be using for your worm bin. If you’re going to use wood, try not purchase anything that’s been treated already. The same goes for plastic containers. The paint and stain (and other chemicals involved) may leak inside your bin; and this will definitely be toxic to your red worms. Going back, you should finish your bedding by filling it up with shredded newspaper and some garden soil.

After making your worm bedding, buy yourself at a local bait store, two pounds worth of standard red composting worms. Every two pounds of worms that you buy should be equivalent to a pound’s worth of organic waste in your home (2 pounds of worms = 1 pound of kitchen scraps), as this will serve as feeds for you worms. Your worms will feed on anything just as long as it’s organic. Never feed them meat-based products, dairy products, eggs, or oily foods, as these may harm their diet.

You may also start harvesting on your worm composting pals probably after a month. You can do this by pulling out the worms from the soil (remove about 4 inches of your topsoil first), and by placing them on a piece of plywood, and then eventually transfer them to a clean container. Do the same process until there’s no soil left, and make sure to cover your worm harvest with some plastic sheets, especially when the sun is still up. Also, wear your gloves when harvesting for worms.

You can definitely start selling your worms after this. But start by computing your start-up expense first; and then decide what your profit margin will start at. Afterwards, prepare the price for your worms. There are always sure buyers for your vermicomposting worms, you just always have to know where to find them.

Make a profit out of worm selling, as it’s always been a good investment. And should you want to improve more on how to raise healthy earthworms effectively, or just simply interested on learning about an earthworm’s life cycle, you may visit other blog posts for more tips on vermicomposting worms.

Starting your own Wood Worm Bin Construction

Sunday, July 11th, 2010
There are a variety of readily available plastic worm bins in the market today; and worm containers made out of wood are also amongst gardeners’ choices. But by choosing to build your own, you not only experience the craft of making it, you also get to assemble a worm bin that will set you apart from all the commercially made containers in the market. Create a bin for your worms that’s specifically designed for worm composting. There are plenty of facts about vermicomposting that you may look up online, to further understand the real need for worm containers. And starting your own wood worm bin construction at home can be also done at your own convenience.
Before proceeding to your wood worm bin construction, consider these first: bin size preference, materials to use, and a good ventilation and drainage system. Wood is a good material, as it provides better aeration and insulation, as compared to plastic-made containers.
Step 1: Plan-out your desired size for the worm bin. You can modify the worm bin size as you base it on the quantity of organic materials that you aim to compost. To calculate for that, you’ll need 1 square foot of surface area (for your bin) for every pound of waste that is put in and casted. Homemade worm bins should be no deeper than 8 to 12 inches, as it enables the composting worms to function properly. This will allow them to feed on organic materials on the soil surface and to take advantage of aeration. Worms climb to top of bin, so make sure that the bin’s dimensions encourages this especially after they’ve deposited their castings.
Step 2: Gather your materials for your worm composting bin. You’ll need a power saw or hand saw, a hammer, a pencil and measuring tape, some glue, a square, a drill (with 1/4″ and 3/32″ bits), and some sandpaper. Also use gears for your eyes, ear and body.  You can build your bin by using a 4-by-8 foot of sheet plywood. Your plywood should also be in exterior grade and should be non-treated (as chemicals may eventually cause a leak inside the bin). You can use this for the bin’s base, lid, sides and ends. You can start assembling all the pieces together by putting glue on it first, before securing it with nails.
Dimensions for the materials:
Bin – 16 in.(H) x 2ft(W) x 4ft(L)
Base and Lid – 2-by-4ft; with sides that measure 16in.x4 ft; ends 16in.x24 in.
Cleats – two-by-fours (screw these into the interior corners of the sides and ends)
Step 3: To create an effective ventilation and aeration system for your red worms, you must drill about 12 (3/8-in.) holes on the bin’s base. Always monitor your bin to check for sufficient aeration even after you’ve placed your bedding, wastes and your worms. For your wood worm bin construction, elevate your bin by giving it legs or placing it on top of bricks. Also make sure to place a tray underneath for collecting leachate drips from the bin. And that’s it!
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For just $119, let Con o Worms provide you with an instant way of turning your kitchen scraps into valuable garden compost. It’s quick, odorless and space efficient; and it’s ideal for new timers!
To know more about the product, check the Con o Worms here.

wooden worm bin constructionThere are a variety of readily available plastic worm bins in the market today; and worm containers made out of wood are also amongst gardeners’ choices. But by choosing to build your own, you not only experience the craft of making it, you also get to assemble a worm bin that will set you apart from all the commercially made containers in the market. Create a bin for your worms that’s specifically designed for worm composting. There are plenty of facts about vermicomposting that you may look up online, to further understand the real need for worm containers. And starting your own wood worm bin construction at home can be also done at your own convenience.

Before proceeding to your wood worm bin construction, consider these first: bin size preference, materials to use, and a good ventilation and drainage system. Wood is a good material, as it provides better aeration and insulation, as compared to plastic-made containers.

Step 1: Plan-out your desired size for the worm bin. You can modify the worm bin size as you base it on the quantity of organic materials that you aim to compost. To calculate for that, you’ll need 1 square foot of surface area (for your bin) for every pound of waste that is put in and casted. Homemade worm bins should be no deeper than 8 to 12 inches, as it enables the composting worms to function properly. This will allow them to feed on organic materials on the soil surface and to take advantage of aeration. Worms climb to top of bin, so make sure that the bin’s dimensions encourages this especially after they’ve deposited their castings.

Step 2: Gather your materials for your worm composting bin. You’ll need a power saw or hand saw, a hammer, a pencil and measuring tape, some glue, a square, a drill (with 1/4″ and 3/32″ bits), and some sandpaper. Also use gears for your eyes, ear and body.  You can build your bin by using a 4-by-8 foot of sheet plywood. Your plywood should also be in exterior grade and should be non-treated (as chemicals may eventually cause a leak inside the bin). You can use this for the bin’s base, lid, sides and ends. You can start assembling all the pieces together by putting glue on it first, before securing it with nails.

Dimensions for the materials:

  • Bin – 16 in.(H) x 2ft(W) x 4ft(L)
  • Base and Lid – 2-by-4ft; with sides that measure 16in.x4 ft; ends 16in.x24 in.
  • Cleats – two-by-fours (screw these into the interior corners of the sides and ends)

Step 3: To create an effective ventilation and aeration system for your red worms, you must drill about 12 (3/8-in.) holes on the bin’s base. Always monitor your bin to check for sufficient aeration even after you’ve placed your bedding, wastes and your worms. For your wood worm bin construction, elevate your bin by giving it legs or placing it on top of bricks. Also make sure to place a tray underneath for collecting leachate drips from the bin. And that’s it!

GardenWorms.com recommends the Can-o-Worms

can-o-worms

For just $119, let Can-o-Worms provide you with an instant way of turning your kitchen scraps into valuable garden compost. It’s quick, odorless and space efficient; and it’s ideal for new timers!

To know more about the product, check the Can-o-Worms here.