Airport Worm Composting – The first of its kind!

The idea of getting into worm Composting before was somewhat unpleasant. And it gave an impression that most people wouldn’t want to visualize for long. But after several attempts at it, it soon became a very popular venture. From simple individuals to expert gardeners, vermicomposting has then evolved. If you can believe it, the use of worms for composting is now being used in Charlotte/Douglas International Airport today. You can find out more from this page on how this particular airport uses compost worms in converting their daily organic garbage into a nutritious resource.

An airports junk can be a compost worm’s treasure!
Who would’ve thought that an airport such as Charlotte/Douglas International Airport would get into worm composting? Then again, it’s one of the best ways to eliminate daily accumulations of trash without having to pollute the ecosystem further. Individuals, and even bigger establishments have already gone into the act of composting. So it’s just about time for a much bigger entity like an airport to get into it as well. It is in fact, a remarkable way of helping reduce organic trash from landfill build-ups. With composting, there will be no more burning of trash (less air pollution), less trash on landfills (unnecessary leaks on both grounds and water bodies will be avoided); and there will be more supply of natural fertilizer that can be used for gardens and farms.
Worm Composting – The way Charlotte/Douglas International Airport does it!
The Charlotte/Douglas International Airport generates plenty of garbage in a day, a lot of which comes directly from daily travelers. And with this in mind, the said airport has decided to install a worm-based composting system, which also comes in conjunction with the new $1.1 million recycling center. With the assistance of hundreds of pounds of red worms, the costs on garbage collections and disposals will be trimmed down. These compost worms will also be able to eat off of two tons of waste on a day-to-day basis, which will then help keep up with the ‘eventual airport expansion’. So not only will these worms help the airport to be more ecological, these tiny creatures will also be able to help the airport to save about $1 million in waste disposal expenses (in a 5-year projection).
What the airport can do with the worm by-product
Compost worms (with the assistance of live microbes), after they’ve gorged on plenty of organic refuse, will gradually excrete a nutrient packed by-product. The consumption and the conversion of these natural wastes will eventually turn up into finished compost (also known as worm castings, worm poop or humus). And with this remarkable conversion, the airport has designed a plan to use this rich by-product as an organic fertilizer for their 6,000 acres of land. They are also looking into packing and selling the compost remains to others who may have the need for it.
The airport’s scheme for composting their garbage
The airport plans to have their garbage fed into their pre-composter first (1,600 sq. ft.), to have the scraps rundown into smaller parts. And as soon as these are broken down and filtered of odors (airport remains such as toilet papers, leftover food, etc.), these will then be stocked into the worm composting system.

The idea of getting into worm Composting before was somewhat unpleasant. And it gave an impression that most people wouldn’t want to visualize for long. But after several attempts at it, it soon became a very popular venture. From simple individuals to expert gardeners, vermicomposting has then evolved. If you can believe it, the use of worms for composting is now being used in Charlotte/Douglas International Airport today. You can find out more from this page on how this particular airport uses compost worms in converting their daily organic garbage into a nutritious resource.

An airports junk can be a compost worm’s treasure!

Who would’ve thought that an airport such as Charlotte/Douglas International Airport would get into worm composting? Then again, it’s one of the best ways to eliminate daily accumulations of trash without having to pollute the ecosystem further. Individuals, and even bigger establishments have already gone into the act of composting. So it’s just about time for a much bigger entity like an airport to get into it as well. It is in fact, a remarkable way of helping reduce organic trash from landfill build-ups. With composting, there will be no more burning of trash (less air pollution), less trash on landfills (unnecessary leaks on both grounds and water bodies will be avoided); and there will be more supply of natural fertilizer that can be used for gardens and farms.

Worm Composting – The way Charlotte/Douglas International Airport does it!

The Charlotte/Douglas International Airport generates plenty of garbage in a day, a lot of which comes directly from daily travelers. And with this in mind, the said airport has decided to install a worm-based composting system, which also comes in conjunction with the new $1.1 million recycling center. With the assistance of hundreds of pounds of red worms, the costs on garbage collections and disposals will be trimmed down. These compost worms will also be able to eat off of two tons of waste on a day-to-day basis, which will then help keep up with the ‘eventual airport expansion’. So not only will these worms help the airport to be more ecological, these tiny creatures will also be able to help the airport to save about $1 million in waste disposal expenses (in a 5-year projection).

What the airport can do with the worm by-product

Compost worms (with the assistance of live microbes), after they’ve gorged on plenty of organic refuse, will gradually excrete a nutrient packed by-product. The consumption and the conversion of these natural wastes will eventually turn up into finished compost (also known as worm castings, worm poop or humus). And with this remarkable conversion, the airport has designed a plan to use this rich by-product as an organic fertilizer for their 6,000 acres of land. They are also looking into packing and selling the compost remains to others who may have the need for it.

The airport’s scheme for composting their garbage

The airport plans to have their garbage fed into their pre-composter first (1,600 sq. ft.), to have the scraps rundown into smaller parts. And as soon as these are broken down and filtered of odors (airport remains such as toilet papers, leftover food, etc.), these will then be stocked into the worm composting system.

via: Triplepundit.com

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