Common Problems and Solutions in Worm Breeding

If you’ve encountered problems when it comes to your worm’s bin (particularly if you’re raising red worms or raising European nightcrawlers), then you can be assured that there are common problems and solutions  in worm breeding that you can learn and rely on. You may encounter some symptoms, so it’s best to know how to deal with these by knowing what caused the particular problem; and then have these solved at the best possible way.

While you’re breeding composting worms (either red wiggler worms or european nightcrawlers), have you ever experienced them crawl out of the bin? Chances are, your worms may be starting to get sick, slowly dying, or starting to attract unwanted pests into the composter. A harsh environment may lead to your worms eventual demise, so know how to care for them the right way.

We all know that everything that is extreme isn’t always that good. So whether you’re using Can-O-Worms and Red Worms for Vermicomposting, or any type of composter, you should take note of the following oversight when it comes to this type of composting:

  • Your worms breathe through their moist skin so you definitely can’t leave your worm composting bin too dry, too wet or too acidic. Leaving the bin too dry will post harmful to your worms, and will eventually lead to their death. Leaving the bin too wet on the other hand can lead to your worms drowning from this. So try to achieve a bedding that has the consistency of a wrung-out sponge. Apart form that, you can’t also leave your worms in a very acidic bin, as they can burn from this.
  • When you’re raising worms, you should also know that you can’t overfeed them nor underfeed them. It’s best that you feed them enough. Now if they happen to ignore much of the food inside the bin, then this can lead to leftover food, which can then lead to unwanted pest visits (a liking for fruit flies in particular). This goes the same with feeding them organic wastes that are bad for them (spoilt food can also cause odor build-up). One good thing that you can do to eliminate odors and pest visits is to bury their food with bedding materials. Avoid feeding them foodstuff that are spicy, salty, oily, citrusy, or anything that has dairy, meat, seafood, or poultry in them.
  • You should also know the right and wrong kinds of food to feed your red wigglers and/or nightcrawlers. Raw or decomposing organic materials (can be obtained from your kitchen or garden) can be given to them just as long as these are: Vegetable or fruits peels, crushed egg shells (also helps balance the pH level inside the worm bin), coffee grounds, used tea bags, grass clippings, strips of newspaper or cardboard, dried leaves, and animal manure (only the ones from plant-eating animals).
  • You also shouldn’t bother them. Red worms or nightcrawlers like to be untouched, especially when they’re busy doing their everyday things. They also like being in dark surroundings, as they can be very sensitive to bright lights. You can only open their bin when it’s time to replenish the bin of new food and bedding, and when harvesting their castings.

When it comes to common problems and solutions  in worm breeding, also take note that worms need a bin with holes (regularly check if there are any blockage), so that air can freely flow in and out of it (worms also need oxygen to be able to live). Much like their need for warmth as well (room temperature in anywhere that they are located in is ideal).

GardenWorms.com recommends the Can-O-Worms

If you want to get a hold of the lowest-priced Can-O-Worms on the internet, then you’ve come to the right place! Our quick, odorless, and space-efficient stackable composter can help breakdown regularly generated wastes from your kitchen and garden. Get your own ‘Black Gold’ produce in just a matter of time. Get yours today, and experience a better vermicomposting process!

To know more about the product, check the Can-O-Worms here.

If you’ve encountered problems when it comes to your worm’s bin (particularly if you’re raising red worms or raising European nightcrawlers), then you can be assured that there are common problems and solutions  in worm breeding that you can learn and rely on. You may encounter some symptoms, so it’s best to know how to deal with these by knowing what caused the particular problem; and then have these solved at the best possible way.

While you’re breeding composting worms (either red wiggler worms or european nightcrawlers), have you ever experienced them crawl out of the bin? Chances are, your worms may be starting to get sick, slowly dying, or starting to attract unwanted pests into the composter. A harsh environment may lead to your worms eventual demise, so know how to care for them the right way.

We all know that everything that is extreme isn’t always that good. So whether you’re using Can-O-Worms and Red Worms for Vermicomposting, or any type of composter, you should take note of the following oversight when it comes to this type of composting:

•    Your worms breathe through their moist skin so you definitely can’t leave your worm composting bin too dry, too wet or too acidic. Leaving the bin too dry will post harmful to your worms, and will eventually lead to their death. Leaving the bin too wet on the other hand can lead to your worms drowning from this. So try to achieve a bedding that has the consistency of a wrung-out sponge. Apart form that, you can’t also leave your worms in a very acidic bin, as they can burn from this.
•    When you’re raising worms, you should also know that you can’t overfeed them nor underfeed them. It’s best that you feed them enough. Now if they happen to ignore much of the food inside the bin, then this can lead to leftover food, which can then lead to unwanted pest visits (a liking for fruit flies in particular). This goes the same with feeding them organic wastes that are bad for them (spoilt food can also cause odor build-up). One good thing that you can do to eliminate odors and pest visits is to bury their food with bedding materials.
o    Avoid feeding them foodstuff that are spicy, salty, oily, citrusy, or anything that has dairy, meat, seafood, or poultry in them.
•    You should also know the right and wrong kinds of food to feed your red wigglers and/or nightcrawlers. Raw or decomposing organic materials (can be obtained from your kitchen or garden) can be given to them just as long as these are:
o    Vegetable or fruits peels, crushed egg shells (also helps balance the pH level inside the worm bin), coffee grounds, used tea bags, grass clippings, strips of newspaper or cardboard, dried leaves, and animal manure (only the ones from plant-eating animals).
•    You also shouldn’t bother them. Red worms or nightcrawlers like to be untouched, especially when they’re busy doing their everyday things. They also like being in dark surroundings, as they can be very sensitive to bright lights. You can only open their bin when it’s time to replenish the bin of new food and bedding, and when harvesting their castings.

When it comes to common problems and solutions  in worm breeding, also take note that worms need a bin with holes (regularly check if there are any blockage), so that air can freely flow in and out of it (worms also need oxygen to be able to live). Much like their need for warmth as well (room temperature in anywhere that they are located in is ideal).

Uncle Jim’s recommends the Can-O-Worms

If you want to get a hold of the lowest-priced Can-O-Worms on the internet, then you’ve come to the right place! Our quick, odorless, and space-efficient stackable composter can help breakdown regularly generated wastes from your kitchen and garden. Get your own ‘Black Gold’ produce in just a matter of time. Get yours today, and experience a better vermicomposting process!

To know more about the product, check the Can-O-Worms here.

Related posts:

  1. Common Problems in Raising Red Wigglers

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