Control Crop Disease through Worm Composting

The process of worm composting has already been tried and tested. And the very by-product of it, which is referred to as worm castings, has been extensively used as a nutrient packed plant fertilizer and as a soil amendment. But other than its other effective functions, any red worms compost can also be used as an alternative medium for managing crop disease/s.

Worm composting and the creation of worm castings
Organic scraps such as a selection of leftovers from the kitchen or from the yard can be used as bedding material, and as a food source for the worms and live microbes. Composting with worms is basically a natural process that aids in converting organic refuse into a finer and richer garden resource. The worm castings, after being excreted by the worms will look just like the soil from the ground. It will come out as an odorless substance that is earthy in shade, and is crumbly in consistency.
Worm compost can also help fight off crop diseases
Worm compost isn’t just your alternative fertilizer or soil enhancer. It has also been discovered to have the capability to avert a certain pathogen that plagues most plants. Now according to the Western Farm Press, the researchers of Cornell University were able to prove this when they tested on different worm groups.
How gathering valuable research materials helps make a difference
Research that has been gathered earlier by Allison Jack (a Ph.D. student) from Professor Eric Nelson’s research group in the Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, discovered that the live microorganisms in the red wigglers castings were able to inhabit the exterior portions of the seed. An organic material is discharged, which then gives the seed the protection that it needs from the disease. The substance that is actually released will form an obstruction with the chemical amid the pathogen and the host.
Worm compost can also be a brutal substance
Worm compost can only post brutal for use when it is applied on plants that are potentially or presently weighed down by pathogens. Eric Carr, a master’s student from Professor Nelson’s test center, has been studying the other ‘suppressive qualities’ of a worm’s manure. Worm castings are tested on a certain pathogen and its different parts of its life cycle. Mr. Carr is constantly finding ways on how newly grown seedlings can be protected with just an application of worm compost, especially when pathogen spores attack.
The challenges that come with using worm compost
There are different kinds of compost used, for which thousands of microorganisms are also involved (particularly in worm composting). But only a few of these can help control specific crop diseases. So determining which ones are effective actually poses as a big challenge for scientists. But this has been eventually resolved through Allison Jack’s collaboration with Worm Power. Worm Power, an Avon, N.Y., company managed by Tom Herlihy, produces 2.5 million pounds of worm compost per annum. Since there is control and consistency in the production of compost, the quality and the composition of the vermicompost will fit well to Jack’s data gathering.

The process of worm composting has already been tried and tested. And the very by-product of it, which is referred to as worm castings, has been extensively used as a nutrient packed plant fertilizer and as a soil amendment. But other than its other effective functions, any red worms compost can also be used as an alternative medium for managing crop disease/s.

Worm composting and the creation of worm castings

Organic scraps such as a selection of leftovers from the kitchen or from the yard can be used as bedding material, and as a food source for the worms and live microbes. Composting with worms is basically a natural process that aids in converting organic refuse into a finer and richer garden resource. The worm castings, after being excreted by the worms will look just like the soil from the ground. It will come out as an odorless substance that is earthy in shade, and is crumbly in consistency.

Worm compost can also help fight off crop diseases

Worm compost isn’t just your alternative fertilizer or soil enhancer. It has also been discovered to have the capability to avert a certain pathogen that plagues most plants. Now according to the Western Farm Press, the researchers of Cornell University were able to prove this when they tested on different worm groups.

How gathering valuable research materials helps make a difference

Research that has been gathered earlier by Allison Jack (a Ph.D. student) from Professor Eric Nelson’s research group in the Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, discovered that the live microorganisms in the red wigglers castings were able to inhabit the exterior portions of the seed. An organic material is discharged, which then gives the seed the protection that it needs from the disease. The substance that is actually released will form an obstruction with the chemical amid the pathogen and the host.

Worm compost can also be a brutal substance

Worm compost can only post brutal for use when it is applied on plants that are potentially or presently weighed down by pathogens. Eric Carr, a master’s student from Professor Nelson’s test center, has been studying the other ‘suppressive qualities’ of a worm’s manure. Worm castings are tested on a certain pathogen and its different parts of its life cycle. Mr. Carr is constantly finding ways on how newly grown seedlings can be protected with just an application of worm compost, especially when pathogen spores attack.

The challenges that come with using worm compost

There are different kinds of compost used, for which thousands of microorganisms are also involved (particularly in worm composting). But only a few of these can help control specific crop diseases. So determining which ones are effective actually poses as a big challenge for scientists. But this has been eventually resolved through Allison Jack’s collaboration with Worm Power. Worm Power, an Avon, N.Y., company managed by Tom Herlihy, produces 2.5 million pounds of worm compost per annum. Since there is control and consistency in the production of compost, the quality and the composition of the vermicompost will fit well to Jack’s data gathering.

via: Westerfarmpress.com

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