What is a Learning Garden?

What is a Learning Garden?
A learning garden isn’t just an educational venue where kids, young adults, or grown-ups can discover, experiment, nurture, or even observe. A dynamic setting such as this can also be an educational tool that other individuals can learn several new things from (this can be a butterfly garden, a healing garden, a recipe garden, a historical garden, a canning garden, or an organic garden). Now, the concept behind the creation of a learning garden started in Europe, which was eventually adapted in the US in the 1890’s. Gardens that were actually built to teach intended to educate others on healthy eating, and learning more about sustainable options.
Schmitt Elementary School has a learning garden!
Schmitt Elementary School has their very own learning garden. The students, teachers, parents, and even several leaders of the community help contribute in developing the green plot. But other than that, the school created such a garden to help teach the students the value of producing organic food, eating healthily, and learning to be more friendly to environment, while keeping the program unified to the teachers’ activities and lesson plans. Putting that into perspective, the school has since transformed a dull space in Schmitt into an area that produces organic goods. The garden, which is just next to the playground, also exudes a vibrant and welcoming feeling to its occupants. Moreover, one of the many advantages to having such a garden is that a majority of the kids in school even get free lunches that used ingredients that came straight from it.
Hands on lessons from learning gardens
Students who take part in hands-on lessons are more likely to remember what their teachers have taught them recently. This gives them the opportunity to retain the processes of what has been directly shown to them. This also helps boost their self-esteem. Now organic gardening is in fact a physical activity. So getting into it will also demonstrate a positive outlook on their well-being (can experience an improvement in mental, emotional, and social growth). But other than that, this also helps them to be more aware of the kinds of fruits and vegetables that they should eat regularly (an increase in nutrition awareness is experienced). This also advocates healthy living and eating for the students, which is something that adults can learn a lot from as well.
The benefits to building a learning garden
Teaching institutions are able to get the most out of growing learning gardens since this helps them to tackle a variety of learning styles, which also goes with other interdisciplinary teachings. Such gardens can encourage children and adults alike, to know how to treat and spruce up Mother Nature, while appreciating the nutrition that it provides. Other than that, a learning garden can also encourage students (regardless of age and grade) to explore the ecosphere. This gives them the chance to play, to learn, and to become aware of what goes in their environment. This also encourages kids and young adults to get more involved in participating in community developments, while improving their gardening skills.

A learning garden isn’t just an educational venue where kids, young adults, or grown-ups can discover, experiment, nurture, or even observe. A dynamic setting such as this can also be an educational tool that other individuals can learn several new things from (this can be a butterfly garden, a healing garden, a recipe garden, a historical garden, a canning garden, or an organic garden). Now, the concept behind the creation of a learning garden started in Europe, which was eventually adapted in the US in the 1890’s. Gardens that were actually built to teach intended to educate others on healthy eating, and learning more about sustainable options.

Schmitt Elementary School has a learning garden!

Schmitt Elementary School has their very own learning garden. The students, teachers, parents, and even several leaders of the community help contribute in developing the green plot. But other than that, the school created such a garden to help teach the students the value of producing organic food, eating healthily, and learning to be more friendly to environment, while keeping the program unified to the teachers’ activities and lesson plans. Putting that into perspective, the school has since transformed a dull space in Schmitt into an area that produces organic goods. The garden, which is just next to the playground, also exudes a vibrant and welcoming feeling to its occupants. Moreover, one of the many advantages to having such a garden is that a majority of the kids in school even get free lunches that used ingredients that came straight from it.

Hands on lessons from learning gardens

Students who take part in hands-on lessons are more likely to remember what their teachers have taught them recently. This gives them the opportunity to retain the processes of what has been directly shown to them. This also helps boost their self-esteem. Now organic gardening is in fact a physical activity. So getting into it will also demonstrate a positive outlook on their well-being (can experience an improvement in mental, emotional, and social growth). But other than that, this also helps them to be more aware of the kinds of fruits and vegetables that they should eat regularly (an increase in nutrition awareness is experienced). This also advocates healthy living and eating for the students, which is something that adults can learn a lot from as well.

The benefits to building a learning garden

Teaching institutions are able to get the most out of growing learning gardens since this helps them to tackle a variety of learning styles, which also goes with other interdisciplinary teachings. Such gardens can encourage children and adults alike, to know how to treat and spruce up Mother Nature, while appreciating the nutrition that it provides. Other than that, a learning garden can also encourage students (regardless of age and grade) to explore the ecosphere. This gives them the chance to play, to learn, and to become aware of what goes in their environment. This also encourages kids and young adults to get more involved in participating in community developments, while improving their gardening skills.

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