Worm Composting: The perks to vermicomposting on campus

Worm Composting: The perks to vermicomposting on campus
Composting has grown into an industry, and has sparked up several interesting projects all over the world including the participation of schools. Now, a lot of school professionals along with their students have already taken interest on both campus gardening and composting; and have certainly reaped countless rewards from this specific venture. But the one thing that stands out is vermicomposting. Vermicomposting is a natural process that involves the use of worms. Not only do worms eat off of organic wastes, they are also capable of producing a nontoxic nutrient-packed compost like no other.
Activities that can be encouraged out of worm composting
There are several ways to using worms for composting on campus. For one, you can have the worms observed in a science class, wherein the whole compost system can be analyzed (life cycle of worms, type of compost worms used, the presence of microbial activity, etc.). But the best way to use these compost worms is to have a specific goal in mind. Many staff and students are already into vermicomposting to help reduce their fill of organic garbage on school grounds; and are also creating their own organic gardens along with the cause. They’re also making sure that they supplement it with an organic fertilizer. These driven individuals make sure that recycling and composting go hand in hand at all times; and the result of this produces a free garden resource called ‘worm castings’.
Space should not be a restriction when vermicomposting
Vermicomposting isn’t just restricted for home or outdoor use. Any staff member or student can do this in the comforts of their own offices or dorm/residence halls. Small-scale vermicomposting can also be done at campus centers and cafeterias (where food scraps are abundant). The space-restricted only needs a compact composter, some organic bedding materials, an organic food source, and some feisty worms (you can buy a worm supply from a nearby garden center, bait shop, or online worm farm) to start off with the process. It’s that convenient to have around.
Compost Bins, Bedding, Organic Food, and Compost Worms
Now, the best tip that you can get out of worm composting is to acquire a small compost bin, and some moist paper shreds. You can also add in some dry foliage when you see some on school grounds. Other than that, use used paper. It’s an ample resource since it’s a staple in school. So you definitely won’t run out of materials that can bed and feed your worms.
The advantages to worm composting on school grounds
Through worm composting, organic garbage that are being dumped on landfills are certainly reduced to a number. Another thing that gets reduced from the school’s expenses would be the cost of having to remove and dispose wastes from the area. Being able to produce worm compost also lessens the university’s costs on having to purchase fertilizers for their organic gardens and irrigation systems. The whole idea of using worms and the sustainable issues that gets solved by this process also helps educate both students and professionals. Vermicomposting on campus not only saves money. These soil creatures also help save the environment.

Composting has grown into an industry, and has sparked up several interesting projects all over the world including the participation of schools. Now, a lot of school professionals along with their students have already taken interest on both campus gardening and composting; and have certainly reaped countless rewards from this specific venture. But the one thing that stands out is vermicomposting. Vermicomposting is a natural process that involves the use of worms. Not only do worms eat off of organic wastes, they are also capable of producing a nontoxic nutrient-packed compost like no other.

Activities that can be encouraged out of worm composting

There are several ways to using worms for composting on campus. For one, you can have the worms observed in a science class, wherein the whole compost system can be analyzed (life cycle of worms, type of compost worms used, the presence of microbial activity, etc.). But the best way to use these compost worms is to have a specific goal in mind. Many staff and students are already into vermicomposting to help reduce their fill of organic garbage on school grounds; and are also creating their own organic gardens along with the cause. They’re also making sure that they supplement it with an organic fertilizer. These driven individuals make sure that recycling and composting go hand in hand at all times; and the result of this produces a free garden resource called ‘worm castings’.

Space should not be a restriction when vermicomposting

Vermicomposting isn’t just restricted for home or outdoor use. Any staff member or student can do this in the comforts of their own offices or dorm/residence halls. Small-scale vermicomposting can also be done at campus centers and cafeterias (where food scraps are abundant). The space-restricted only needs a compact composter, some organic bedding materials, an organic food source, and some feisty worms (you can buy a worm supply from a nearby garden center, bait shop, or online worm farm) to start off with the process. It’s that convenient to have around.

Compost Bins, Bedding, Organic Food, and Compost Worms

Now, the best tip that you can get out of worm composting is to acquire a small compost bin, and some moist paper shreds. You can also add in some dry foliage when you see some on school grounds. Other than that, use used paper. It’s an ample resource since it’s a staple in school. So you definitely won’t run out of materials that can bed and feed your worms.

The advantages to worm composting on school grounds

Through worm composting, organic garbage that are being dumped on landfills are certainly reduced to a number. Another thing that gets reduced from the school’s expenses would be the cost of having to remove and dispose wastes from the area. Being able to produce worm compost also lessens the university’s costs on having to purchase fertilizers for their organic gardens and irrigation systems. The whole idea of using worms and the sustainable issues that gets solved by this process also helps educate both students and professionals. Vermicomposting on campus not only saves money. These soil creatures also help save the environment.

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