95% of Trash Recycled in 2040 – Austin, Texas

January 6th, 2012
Composting – A Zero Waste Resolution
A zero waste resolution is possible, especially if you carry out a composting plan. Composting has been long used, and has been a remarkable environmental advancement. It is a natural process that not only helps convert organic refuse into a reusable resource. It’s a process that also encourages less consumption and collection of garbage. How’s that for an ecological and sustainable breakthrough!
The city of Austin initiates a promising waste plan
Austin city has a goal, and that is to recycle 95% of its garbage by the year 2040. But how can they push through with this kind of strategy? Well, the town will be putting into operation a waste plan that is completely retuned. They will be using only the latest approaches in garbage cutback, recycling, and composting. Moreover, this will also help find out which techniques will both help on producing fewer garbage and cutting on costs.
Understanding Austin’s master plan
According to Austin Resource Recovery’s master plan, Austin city is hoping to execute their plan of removing all wastes from landfills; and aspiring to return all of these ‘refuse’ into something that can be reused again. Bob Gedert, Director of Austin Resource Recovery, even believes that the build-up of wastes in landfills today should be given a ‘second life’, as these are materials that may still have some significance later on. But other than this view, Resource Recovery’s plan is also pushing through reaching targets in the form of a ‘set waste diversion’. They intend to get this scheme going every five years, which already started in 2010 (already started a 35% diversion). This will be further endorsed by using recycling facilities more often. Supplementary compost collector units will also be provided, and will be made available to Austin’s citizens by the year 2015.
Making a commitment is everything!
Austin city is a good example of a unified municipality. If they can execute plans that their town will strongly benefit from, so can we. And all it takes is a little commitment from each and everyone. A project as big as Austin’s is in it for the long run. But knowing how to recycle and to compost also has an underlying factor. Waste reduction should be taught properly. If your city wants its projects to work smoothly, it should also be able to provide the materials needed (learning materials should always be accessible and convenient for its citizens to acquire). Learning about which items are recyclable or compostable will greatly help in reducing landfill build-up and more.
Waste management can start anywhere and by anyone
With a concise effort from every individual, a zero waste plan can be done successfully. Several business establishments such as restaurants, and other institutions such as school and parks are already helping manage their own collection of garbage. Composting is even practiced in several teaching facilities today, as students and teachers have been making it a part of their daily routine to recycle and compost whatever they could. Believe it or not, cafeteria leftovers and used papers are being fed to compost worms (the process of vermicomposting), to help produce a nutrient rich fertilizer and soilamendment.

Composting – A Zero Waste Resolution

A zero waste resolution is possible, especially if you carry out a composting plan. Composting has been long used, and has been a remarkable environmental advancement. It is a natural process that not only helps convert organic refuse into a reusable resource. It’s a process that also encourages less consumption and collection of garbage. How’s that for an ecological and sustainable breakthrough!

The city of Austin initiates a promising waste plan

Austin city has a goal, and that is to recycle 95% of its garbage by the year 2040. But how can they push through with this kind of strategy? Well, the town will be putting into operation a waste plan that is completely retuned. They will be using only the latest approaches in garbage cutback, recycling, and composting. Moreover, this will also help find out which techniques will both help on producing fewer garbage and cutting on costs.

Understanding Austin’s master plan

According to Austin Resource Recovery’s master plan, Austin city is hoping to execute their plan of removing all wastes from landfills; and aspiring to return all of these ‘refuse’ into something that can be reused again. Bob Gedert, Director of Austin Resource Recovery, even believes that the build-up of wastes in landfills today should be given a ‘second life’, as these are materials that may still have some significance later on. But other than this view, Resource Recovery’s plan is also pushing through reaching targets in the form of a ‘set waste diversion’. They intend to get this scheme going every five years, which already started in 2010 (already started a 35% diversion). This will be further endorsed by using recycling facilities more often. Supplementary compost collector units will also be provided, and will be made available to Austin’s citizens by the year 2015.

Making a commitment is everything!

Austin city is a good example of a unified municipality. If they can execute plans that their town will strongly benefit from, so can we. And all it takes is a little commitment from each and everyone. A project as big as Austin’s is in it for the long run. But knowing how to recycle and to compost also has an underlying factor. Waste reduction should be taught properly. If your city wants its projects to work smoothly, it should also be able to provide the materials needed (learning materials should always be accessible and convenient for its citizens to acquire). Learning about which items are recyclable or compostable will greatly help in reducing landfill build-up and more.

Waste management can start anywhere and by anyone

With a concise effort from every individual, a zero waste plan can be done successfully. Several business establishments such as restaurants, and other institutions such as school and parks are already helping manage their own collection of garbage. Composting is even practiced in several teaching facilities today, as students and teachers have been making it a part of their daily routine to recycle and compost whatever they could. Believe it or not, cafeteria leftovers and used papers are being fed to compost worms (the process of vermicomposting), to help produce a nutrient rich fertilizer and soil amendment.

via: Harvestpower.com

Airport Worm Composting – The first of its kind!

January 4th, 2012

The idea of getting into worm Composting before was somewhat unpleasant. And it gave an impression that most people wouldn’t want to visualize for long. But after several attempts at it, it soon became a very popular venture. From simple individuals to expert gardeners, vermicomposting has then evolved. If you can believe it, the use of worms for composting is now being used in Charlotte/Douglas International Airport today. You can find out more from this page on how this particular airport uses compost worms in converting their daily organic garbage into a nutritious resource.

An airports junk can be a compost worm’s treasure!
Who would’ve thought that an airport such as Charlotte/Douglas International Airport would get into worm composting? Then again, it’s one of the best ways to eliminate daily accumulations of trash without having to pollute the ecosystem further. Individuals, and even bigger establishments have already gone into the act of composting. So it’s just about time for a much bigger entity like an airport to get into it as well. It is in fact, a remarkable way of helping reduce organic trash from landfill build-ups. With composting, there will be no more burning of trash (less air pollution), less trash on landfills (unnecessary leaks on both grounds and water bodies will be avoided); and there will be more supply of natural fertilizer that can be used for gardens and farms.
Worm Composting – The way Charlotte/Douglas International Airport does it!
The Charlotte/Douglas International Airport generates plenty of garbage in a day, a lot of which comes directly from daily travelers. And with this in mind, the said airport has decided to install a worm-based composting system, which also comes in conjunction with the new $1.1 million recycling center. With the assistance of hundreds of pounds of red worms, the costs on garbage collections and disposals will be trimmed down. These compost worms will also be able to eat off of two tons of waste on a day-to-day basis, which will then help keep up with the ‘eventual airport expansion’. So not only will these worms help the airport to be more ecological, these tiny creatures will also be able to help the airport to save about $1 million in waste disposal expenses (in a 5-year projection).
What the airport can do with the worm by-product
Compost worms (with the assistance of live microbes), after they’ve gorged on plenty of organic refuse, will gradually excrete a nutrient packed by-product. The consumption and the conversion of these natural wastes will eventually turn up into finished compost (also known as worm castings, worm poop or humus). And with this remarkable conversion, the airport has designed a plan to use this rich by-product as an organic fertilizer for their 6,000 acres of land. They are also looking into packing and selling the compost remains to others who may have the need for it.
The airport’s scheme for composting their garbage
The airport plans to have their garbage fed into their pre-composter first (1,600 sq. ft.), to have the scraps rundown into smaller parts. And as soon as these are broken down and filtered of odors (airport remains such as toilet papers, leftover food, etc.), these will then be stocked into the worm composting system.

The idea of getting into worm Composting before was somewhat unpleasant. And it gave an impression that most people wouldn’t want to visualize for long. But after several attempts at it, it soon became a very popular venture. From simple individuals to expert gardeners, vermicomposting has then evolved. If you can believe it, the use of worms for composting is now being used in Charlotte/Douglas International Airport today. You can find out more from this page on how this particular airport uses compost worms in converting their daily organic garbage into a nutritious resource.

An airports junk can be a compost worm’s treasure!

Who would’ve thought that an airport such as Charlotte/Douglas International Airport would get into worm composting? Then again, it’s one of the best ways to eliminate daily accumulations of trash without having to pollute the ecosystem further. Individuals, and even bigger establishments have already gone into the act of composting. So it’s just about time for a much bigger entity like an airport to get into it as well. It is in fact, a remarkable way of helping reduce organic trash from landfill build-ups. With composting, there will be no more burning of trash (less air pollution), less trash on landfills (unnecessary leaks on both grounds and water bodies will be avoided); and there will be more supply of natural fertilizer that can be used for gardens and farms.

Worm Composting – The way Charlotte/Douglas International Airport does it!

The Charlotte/Douglas International Airport generates plenty of garbage in a day, a lot of which comes directly from daily travelers. And with this in mind, the said airport has decided to install a worm-based composting system, which also comes in conjunction with the new $1.1 million recycling center. With the assistance of hundreds of pounds of red worms, the costs on garbage collections and disposals will be trimmed down. These compost worms will also be able to eat off of two tons of waste on a day-to-day basis, which will then help keep up with the ‘eventual airport expansion’. So not only will these worms help the airport to be more ecological, these tiny creatures will also be able to help the airport to save about $1 million in waste disposal expenses (in a 5-year projection).

What the airport can do with the worm by-product

Compost worms (with the assistance of live microbes), after they’ve gorged on plenty of organic refuse, will gradually excrete a nutrient packed by-product. The consumption and the conversion of these natural wastes will eventually turn up into finished compost (also known as worm castings, worm poop or humus). And with this remarkable conversion, the airport has designed a plan to use this rich by-product as an organic fertilizer for their 6,000 acres of land. They are also looking into packing and selling the compost remains to others who may have the need for it.

The airport’s scheme for composting their garbage

The airport plans to have their garbage fed into their pre-composter first (1,600 sq. ft.), to have the scraps rundown into smaller parts. And as soon as these are broken down and filtered of odors (airport remains such as toilet papers, leftover food, etc.), these will then be stocked into the worm composting system.

via: Triplepundit.com

Rooftop Gardening: Turning a monotonous-looking rooftop into a garden

January 2nd, 2012

Most residential buildings have bare-looking rooftops that can be turned into a luscious garden. Now that most people are geared into creating eco-friendly spaces, developing a garden all the way up the roof is another option for city dwellers. Rooftop gardening is definitely the answer to turning boring rooftops into a beautiful plot.

Rooftop Gardening Facts

Rooftop gardening is not something that you can do whenever you want to. Unless you have your own roof to use, you’ll be required to submit and acquire certain requirements and approvals from specific authorities before proceeding to your garden project. Take for example the owner/s of the building, apartment, or condominium that you’re residing in. An approval to a garden set-up will certainly have to be requested from them. Other than that, there are also regulations that are stipulated by the city you’re living in, so make sure to abide by those as well.

Investing on Rooftop Gardens

Rooftop gardens are good investments. Not only will you gain access to a plot that grows fresh and healthy produce, you’ll also be helping the environment in return. How? Well, gardens such as those on the roof can help in improving the quality of the air (as plants release oxygen). We all know how certain cities can get so polluted from all the smog and smoke. But aside from that, gardens that are developed on the roof also provide a means of insulation for buildings. Such green roofs for healthy cities can also aid in delaying water run-offs after a heavy downpour.

Rooftop Garden Essentials

A sustainable roof garden design should have the following materials: a filter sheet, a waterproof layer, a roof membrane, a moisture blanket, some loose soil, plants, or seeds.

Whether you’re into developing flowers, fruits, herbs, or rooftop vegetable gardens, make sure that your green patch has a filter sheet. The layer itself will let the excess water to drain from the roof. The waterproof layer on the other hand will function as the roof’s protective cover. This is usually placed on top of the roof so that leaks will be avoided from ruining the rooftop.

A roof membrane should also be present in the construction of your roof garden, as this pond lining will be placed on top of the waterproof coating. The moisture blanket on the other hand is another layer (can be literally from old blankets or used cardboard). It works as a ‘growth medium’, making sure that the soil retains enough moisture into its system (to keep plant-life thriving). Now, soil is also essential when it comes to any form of gardening, as well as your choice of plants and seeds. These raw materials will become your last layer.

Plant your preferred plants

Rooftop Gardening also requires that you grow plants according to the weather conditions and restrictions in your location. Take for example an area that gets ample amounts of sunshine everyday. You can try planting shrubs on this type of setting.

Most residential buildings have bare-looking rooftops that can be turned into a luscious garden. Now that most people are geared into creating eco-friendly spaces, developing a garden all the way up the roof is another option for city dwellers. Rooftop gardening is definitely the answer to turning boring rooftops into a beautiful plot.
Rooftop Gardening Facts
Rooftop gardening is not something that you can do whenever you want to. Unless you have your own roof to use, you’ll be required to submit and acquire certain requirements and approvals from specific authorities before proceeding to your garden project. Take for example the owner/s of the building, apartment, or condominium that you’re residing in. An approval to a garden set-up will certainly have to be requested from them. Other than that, there are also regulations that are stipulated by the city you’re living in, so make sure to abide by those as well.
Investing on Rooftop Gardens
Rooftop gardens are good investments. Not only will you gain access to a plot that grows fresh and healthy produce, you’ll also be helping the environment in return. How? Well, gardens such as those on the roof can help in improving the quality of the air (as plants release oxygen). We all know how certain cities can get so polluted from all the smog and smoke. But aside from that, gardens that are developed on the roof also provide a means of insulation for buildings. Such green roofs for healthy cities can also aid in delaying water run-offs after a heavy downpour.
Rooftop Garden Essentials
A sustainable roof garden design should have the following materials: a filter sheet, a waterproof layer, a roof membrane, a moisture blanket, some loose soil, plants, or seeds.
Whether you’re into developing flowers, fruits, herbs, or rooftop vegetable gardens, make sure that your green patch has a filter sheet. The layer itself will let the excess water to drain from the roof. The waterproof layer on the other hand will function as the roof’s protective cover. This is usually placed on top of the roof so that leaks will be avoided from ruining the rooftop.
A roof membrane should also be present in the construction of your roof garden, as this pond lining will be placed on top of the waterproof coating. The moisture blanket on the other hand is another layer (can be literally from old blankets or used cardboard). It works as a ‘growth medium’, making sure that the soil retains enough moisture into its system (to keep plant-life thriving). Now, soil is also essential when it comes to any form of gardening, as well as your choice of plants and seeds. These raw materials will become your last layer.
Plant your preferred plants
Rooftop Gardening also requires that you grow plants according to the weather conditions and restrictions in your location. Take for example an area that gets ample amounts of sunshine everyday. You can try planting shrubs on this type of setting.

The merits to Community Composting

December 31st, 2011

Working together as a community helps to accomplish a variety of undertakings. Just like what happens with a Community composting program. Community composting creates not only an environmental awareness. It also fosters a bond between groups of people who continuously pushes for the betterment of their neighborhood.

What to expect from community composting

Typically, most communities will be provided by their respective cities with sturdy containers that will be used for storing compost materials. The compost bin is where a selection of kitchen and yard wastes will be deposited and contained. It basically turns into a storage unit, which helps create an organic resource thereafter. Now, as soon as the process is done (when the finished compost is ready for harvesting), the bin will then be emptied and delivered to a community compost facility.

8,000 Calgary residences try out community composting

Calgary city recently started a pilot project that helped introduce the ways to creating organic compost. Almost 8,000 residences (all residing within Abbeydale, Brentwood, Cougar Ridge, and Southwood) have been given their own free composters in the form of kitchen pails with liners. Compostable yard bags, carts, and other written information were also made available to homeowners who may have questions about the compost production process, pick-up schedules, etc.  The city director of waste and recycling, Dave Griffiths is routing for some good feedback on the project, in hopes that the program will also be a positive one.

More on the Calgary Community Composting program

The city has invested a lot of money. $1.3 million has been allotted to be exact. This already includes the pick-up and collection of compost from communities to the compost facilities (by means of city trucks), the purchase of composters, contracts and campaigns, and so on. Now the residents have not been charged with anything. All they are asked for is to participate in the project, and to help make things happen. Green waste is not a problem. Such projects can encourage groups of people to collect green wastes; and to see such a program as a chance to reap out valuable resources out of it.

Composting green waste at home

The organic refuse that is accumulated daily (typical household trimmings and food scraps) can be composted. Now biodegradable refuse can be made not only into compost, but as mulch as well. But other than that, organic compost can also be used as a plant fertilizer and as a soil amendment (has a good mixture of essential nutrients such as nitrogen and carbon). Composting can actually help create an organic product that will help plants to develop and to increase in yield. It can also aid in improving a worn out soil to spring back to a healthier condition. Soils that have been badly damaged but have been nourished with compost will be able to show improvements in its ability to retain more moisture and nutrients into its system. A healthy soil will also be able to protect plant roots from being rigged by potential diseases.

Benefits of Piggery Composting

December 28th, 2011

Composting has its many forms. As nature has its ways of making organic refuse into something that can be reused again. Even compost worms are made capable of converting natural wastes into an organic resource that can be both used to supplement garden plants or even farm soils. But one of the most remarkable discovery’s today would be Piggery composting. Pigs have been described to be the ideal cultivators.

Why are pigs considered the ultimate cultivators?
Having a few pigs, or a swine farm at that would be advantageous on your end. Pigs are capable of plowing and turning the earth (pigs even dig into the soil using just their noses), and rooting up weeds. These farm animals will dig beds for you, while they excrete their nutrient rich humus on your farms soils. Just as long as they’re confined in a spacious pen, they will be able to work and move productively on your specified areas.
Pigs love to eat!
Pigs love to eat fresh soil that has been nourished with organic humus (the best kind of soil would be from the areas that aren’t polluted, like the mountains for instance). It’s actually good for their health. So the lesser chemicals there are in the soil, the better health’s these pigs will have. But not only are hogs into consuming fresh dirt. They are also into eating grass, grass roots, tree roots, and a few other organic refuse such as wood, piles of cattle or horse manure. Now the consumption of these natural materials will eventually be excreted into a rich black soil. It’s just like how compost worms do it after a few months of breaking down kitchen scraps and garden wastes. Other than that, the organic matter that the pigs have composted will also contain a rich supply of live microbes. These live microorganisms can also be made into a good food source for the boars.
The value in biosecurity when composting with pigs
Whether it’s potentially acquiring something that is bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral, protecting agricultural animals from these should always be a priority when managing any type of farm. It is for each and everyone’s safety; and that’s why having biosecurity is important. It’s a system that helps protect animals such as pigs from different forms of contagious means (a good example of an outbreak would be swine flu). Aside from these, you can also reinforce your farms’ biosecurity by putting up proper signage for areas that are off-limits. You can also require your personnel and visitors to always wear protective gears such as cleans boots and coveralls when moving on to different locations.
How to keep your swine farm protected through composting
Using pigs to produce organic compost can already help wipe out some of the potential disease epidemics that can be acquired from the farm vicinity. The diseases that can be procured from other farming methods (such as the use of rendering trucks, fuel trucks or other foreign vehicles being entered on farming grounds, etc.) can be eliminated even just through composting with pigs.

Composting has its many forms. As nature has its ways of making organic refuse into something that can be reused again. Even compost worms are made capable of converting natural wastes into an organic resource that can be both used to supplement garden plants or even farm soils. But one of the most remarkable discovery’s today would be Piggery composting. Pigs have been described to be the ideal cultivators.

Why are pigs considered the ultimate cultivators?

Having a few pigs, or a swine farm at that would be advantageous on your end. Pigs are capable of plowing and turning the earth (pigs even dig into the soil using just their noses), and rooting up weeds. These farm animals will dig beds for you, while they excrete their nutrient rich humus on your farms soils. Just as long as they’re confined in a spacious pen, they will be able to work and move productively on your specified areas.

Pigs love to eat!

Pigs love to eat fresh soil that has been nourished with organic humus (the best kind of soil would be from the areas that aren’t polluted, like the mountains for instance). It’s actually good for their health. So the lesser chemicals there are in the soil, the better health’s these pigs will have. But not only are hogs into consuming fresh dirt. They are also into eating grass, grass roots, tree roots, and a few other organic refuse such as wood, piles of cattle or horse manure. Now the consumption of these natural materials will eventually be excreted into a rich black soil. It’s just like how compost worms do it after a few months of breaking down kitchen scraps and garden wastes. Other than that, the organic matter that the pigs have composted will also contain a rich supply of live microbes. These live microorganisms can also be made into a good food source for the boars.

The value in biosecurity when composting with pigs

Whether it’s potentially acquiring something that is bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral, protecting agricultural animals from these should always be a priority when managing any type of farm. It is for each and everyone’s safety; and that’s why having biosecurity is important. It’s a system that helps protect animals such as pigs from different forms of contagious means (a good example of an outbreak would be swine flu). Aside from these, you can also reinforce your farms’ biosecurity by putting up proper signage for areas that are off-limits. You can also require your personnel and visitors to always wear protective gears such as cleans boots and coveralls when moving on to different locations.

How to keep your swine farm protected through composting

Using pigs to produce organic compost can already help wipe out some of the potential disease epidemics that can be acquired from the farm vicinity. The diseases that can be procured from other farming methods (such as the use of rendering trucks, fuel trucks or other foreign vehicles being entered on farming grounds, etc.) can be eliminated even just through composting with pigs.

The best holiday gift choices for gardeners

December 25th, 2011

There are several holiday gift items that may come into mind, especially for any family or friend who’s into gardening or composting. And there are actually numerous selections in the market today that can help narrow down your options. Here’s a good itemized list of possible gardening and other composting supplies that may post helpful this holiday season.

Gardener’s like composters too!

Whether it’s winter, spring, summer, or fall, there will always be that perfect horticultural and composting tool that is waiting to be given away this festive season. You can even consider giving composting bins as gifts for example. Now, composters are perfect for those who may or may not have enough yard space at home. Gardeners will be able to appreciate such storing units since these containers work by converting kitchen and yard scraps into a nutrient packed garden resource (a soil like material that can be used as an organic fertilizer or soil amendment). Now, for a great first choice, you might want to try GardenWorms.com 71-Gallon Urban Compost Tumbler. This portable compost tumbler is easy to use, requires less turning, and is of low maintenance. Moreover, it is kid and pest proof, and is also great at filtering foul odors (amongst its other highlights).

How about some fashionable gardening gloves?

The Orange Paisley Gloves from Womanswork.com is also a perfect addition to any gardener’s collection of gardening accessories. You can simply get yourself a pair from Womanswork.com; and get to experience first hand, the comfort and stability it offers. Each stylish pair is created with leather material (for the palms), which also comes with a cord on the cuff for easy binding. It also has UPF 50+, and is only offered for $29.00 a pair. Gardening has never been this fashionable!

A more exciting way to rid of weeds in the garden

There’s nothing fun about getting all the weeds from the ground. It’s both strenuous and is back breaking. And another sad fact is that you can’t just get rid of the weeds by means of mowing or trimming. Weeds, also known as wildflowers, require some deep uprooting. Weed roots should be completely taken out from the ground to prevent these from sprouting back again. But there is one solution to this without compromising your physique, and that’s getting the CobraHead Weeder. This particular gardening tool has a super sharp edge, which also goes with a really pointed tip. It also works well in clay soils, as the blade can certainly cut through the ground, and destroy the weed roots all at the same time.

Essential oils for the dry and aching gardening hands

Gardeners will always have to rely on their hands to do some planting, digging, and so forth. At some point, their hands will look dirty, cracked up, and dry. But there is a great solution for such hardworking hands. You can give your gardener pals body care products as a gift this Christmas. There are actually several essential oils that may help bring back that vigor back to their hands. For starters, you can choose to purchase any of the wonderful oil selections at eoproducts.com.

The perfect gift for the gardener/composter!

You may know a few gardeners that may also be into composting with worms. So other than giving red worms as gifts to them, you might also want to throw in an additional Claw Fork Compost Turner as a present. This works best for those who have worm farms. This unit will readily help in aerating the compost materials that are tossed inside the container with much ease.

Ingredients that are Good for your Compost

December 25th, 2011

The act of composting not only produces the richest kind of fertilizer known to date. It is also a natural process that aids in keeping the earth a garbage-less place. Now, compost only becomes nutrient-packed solely for the reason that the ingredients used for creating it are all organic materials. This composting by-product contains natural matter that is filled with nitrogen, carbon, and several other nutrients and elements.

Microbes thrive on compost
The production of compost can either be done through plain composting or by means of vermicomposting (creates compost with the help of red worms). Either way the creation of compost is predominantly done by live microbes. They are in fact, the ones that are mainly responsible for breaking down decaying organic substances. Now, live microorganisms thrive abundantly in a system that includes the most important of elements. Other than their need for nitrogen and carbon-rich materials, microbes also require oxygen, heat, and moisture to be able to work productively.
Compost ingredients that are high in nitrogen
Compost is mainly composed of a balance of nitrogen and carbon rich matter; and a balanced mixture aids in the microorganisms proper breakdown of organic scraps. Moreover, the addition of water into the mix also helps expedite the process of decomposition. But other than that, organic wastes that are high in nitrogen are typically green in shade. These items are mostly high in protein, amino acids, nucleic acids, and enzymes; and are typically composed of green tree leaves, weeds, grass clippings, plant cuttings, (can also be collected from your backyard, garden), fruit and vegetable scraps, coffee grounds (an exception to color), and the like. Now, for an additional fact: if there isn’t enough nitrogen in the compost system, the process will have a slower turnover.
Compost ingredients that are high in carbon
Carbon-packed organic scraps are actually those that are dry and brown in color. These can be in the form of dead leaves (autumn leaves can be a good example), twigs or bark, sawdust or woodchips, straw, mixed paper (composting worms love gorging on newspapers and corrugated cardboards), and so on.
The importance of heat, oxygen, and moisture in a composting system
For you to be able to create a nutrient-packed compost, you will also need to incorporate heat, oxygen, and moisture. Even if you’ve got an abundant supply of nitrogen and carbon materials, you will still need these three other components to be able to harvest a well-converted finished product. Heat is necessary when composting as this keeps the beneficial organisms from dying. Oxygen on the other hand helps speed up the process. Then again, a compost system may also go without it. The only setback to this would be a slow down in the process as well as the creation of smelly odors. Other than that, moisture is also a key element. The best consistency for your system is actually that of a wrung out sponge.
GardenWorms.com recommends offering your compost a balance of nutrients
Providing your compost with a balanced mix of nutrients, such as those that are high in nitrogen and carbon, will help you reap a wholesome finished product. So collect all of the ‘greens’ and ‘browns’ that can be gathered from your kitchen and yard, and start composting these today!
To know more about offering your compost a balance of nutrients, check theadvertiser.com here.

The act of composting not only produces the richest kind of fertilizer known to date. It is also a natural process that aids in keeping the earth a garbage-less place. Now, compost only becomes nutrient-packed solely for the reason that the ingredients used for creating it are all organic materials. This composting by-product contains natural matter that is filled with nitrogen, carbon, and several other nutrients and elements.

Microbes thrive on compost

The production of compost can either be done through plain composting or by means of vermicomposting (creates compost with the help of red worms). Either way the creation of compost is predominantly done by live microbes. They are in fact, the ones that are mainly responsible for breaking down decaying organic substances. Now, live microorganisms thrive abundantly in a system that includes the most important of elements. Other than their need for nitrogen and carbon-rich materials, microbes also require oxygen, heat, and moisture to be able to work productively.

Compost ingredients that are high in nitrogen

Compost is mainly composed of a balance of nitrogen and carbon rich matter; and a balanced mixture aids in the microorganisms proper breakdown of organic scraps. Moreover, the addition of water into the mix also helps expedite the process of decomposition. But other than that, organic wastes that are high in nitrogen are typically green in shade. These items are mostly high in protein, amino acids, nucleic acids, and enzymes; and are typically composed of green tree leaves, weeds, grass clippings, plant cuttings, (can also be collected from your backyard, garden), fruit and vegetable scraps, coffee grounds (an exception to color), and the like. Now, for an additional fact: if there isn’t enough nitrogen in the compost system, the process will have a slower turnover.

Compost ingredients that are high in carbon

Carbon-packed organic scraps are actually those that are dry and brown in color. These can be in the form of dead leaves (autumn leaves can be a good example), twigs or bark, sawdust or woodchips, straw, mixed paper (composting worms love gorging on newspapers and corrugated cardboards), and so on.

The importance of heat, oxygen, and moisture in a composting system

For you to be able to create a nutrient-packed compost, you will also need to incorporate heat, oxygen, and moisture. Even if you’ve got an abundant supply of nitrogen and carbon materials, you will still need these three other components to be able to harvest a well-converted finished product. Heat is necessary when composting as this keeps the beneficial organisms from dying. Oxygen on the other hand helps speed up the process. Then again, a compost system may also go without it. The only setback to this would be a slow down in the process as well as the creation of smelly odors. Other than that, moisture is also a key element. The best consistency for your system is actually that of a wrung out sponge.

GardenWorms.com recommends offering your compost a balance of nutrients

Providing your compost with a balanced mix of nutrients, such as those that are high in nitrogen and carbon, will help you reap a wholesome finished product. So collect all of the ‘greens’ and ‘browns’ that can be gathered from your kitchen and yard, and start composting these today!

Environmental Awareness Gardening Projects

December 21st, 2011

Don’t you find it amazing when the general public gets together in finding ways to be more environmentally aware? It definitely is. What more globally, right? People nowadays are encouraged to learn about the different earth-saving methods. With this in mind, both organic gardening and composting are two of the most well used natural processes today. Both can offer countless rewards and benefits.

Gardening using organic compost

A garden can go in full bloom when it is supplemented with something extra. Most of the time, gardens that have not been applied with fertilizers only get so much of the water and nutrients that its crops need to fully develop. Organic fertilizers such as red worms compost, actually contain live microorganisms and organic materials, from which plants can benefit a lot from. Such natural products can help provide additional nutrients for any type of plant’s consumption, as it becomes a full meal for the garden’s crops.

Middlesex County – Hosting Free Composting Workshops

Not everything comes cheap. But if it were free, then there’s definitely a catch to it. But the Middlesex County thinks otherwise. The only thing that can be taken home from their free and sponsored backyard composting workshops would be an added knowledge. County residents that participated in the workshops were able to learn about the importance of waste reduction; and how the proper breakdown of decaying organic materials (such as kitchen scraps and yard wastes) can produce a nutritious mix that can aid in improving the soil of their gardens. They were also given instructions on how to troubleshoot problems that may occur while composting. Vermicomposting was also demonstrated.

The production of ‘Black Gold’

Just like the Middlesex County, special units from Millville (the Cumberland County Improvement Authority, Cumberland Master Gardeners Program, and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Cumberland County) also came up with a composting course that residents can easily partake in. They’ve managed to offer a course that will encourage its homeowners to produce their own ‘black gold’. Locals will also be taught on the how-to’s of turning their food and yard wastes into organic compost.

A program such as this definitely creates an awareness, especially when it comes to keeping a percentage of raw materials from going straight to the landfills. By composting, harmful gases (like methane) and leaks from landfills will also be avoided and reduced.

Using the garden as an alternative teaching mechanism

Other than the value in composting, the students at Griffith Elementary School also found gardening in raised garden beds a great school activity. Children were able to get a hands-on learning experience by simply tending to an organic garden. They are also being exposed to the actual biology of different plants, which also gives correspondence to some of their class lessons. Now, apart from these kids being taught about the value of organic gardening, they are also being encouraged on knowing the proper ways to planting, watering, and harvesting.

Don’t you find it amazing when the general public gets together in finding ways to be more environmentally aware? It definitely is. What more globally, right? People nowadays are encouraged to learn about the different earth-saving methods. With this in mind, both organic gardening and composting are two of the most well used natural processes today. Both can offer countless rewards and benefits.

Gardening using organic compost
A garden can go in full bloom when it is supplemented with something extra. Most of the time, gardens that have not been applied with fertilizers only get so much of the water and nutrients that its crops need to fully develop. Organic fertilizers such as worm castings tea, actually contain live microorganisms and organic materials, from which plants can benefit a lot from. Such natural products can help provide additional nutrients for any type of plant’s consumption, as it becomes a full meal for the garden’s crops.
Middlesex County – Hosting Free Composting Workshops
Not everything comes cheap. But if it were free, then there’s definitely a catch to it. But the Middlesex County thinks otherwise. The only thing that can be taken home from their free and sponsored backyard composting workshops would be an added knowledge. County residents that participated in the workshops were able to learn about the importance of waste reduction; and how the proper breakdown of decaying organic materials (such as kitchen scraps and yard wastes) can produce a nutritious mix that can aid in improving the soil of their gardens. They were also given instructions on how to troubleshoot problems that may occur while composting. Vermicomposting was also demonstrated.
The production of ‘Black Gold’
Just like the Middlesex County, special units from Millville (the Cumberland County Improvement Authority, Cumberland Master Gardeners Program, and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Cumberland County) also came up with a composting course that residents can easily partake in. They’ve managed to offer a course that will encourage its homeowners to produce their own ‘black gold’. Locals will also be taught on the how-to’s of turning their food and yard wastes into organic compost.
A program such as this definitely creates an awareness, especially when it comes to keeping a percentage of raw materials from going straight to the landfills. By composting, harmful gases (like methane) and leaks from landfills will also be avoided and reduced.
Using the garden as an alternative teaching mechanism
Other than the value in composting, the students at Griffith Elementary School also found gardening in raised garden beds a great school activity. Children were able to get a hands-on learning experience by simply tending to an organic garden. They are also being exposed to the actual biology of different plants, which also gives correspondence to some of their class lessons. Now, apart from these kids being taught about the value of organic gardening, they are also being encouraged on knowing the proper ways to planting, watering, and harvestin

Fall Composting: Composting Autumn Leaves

December 18th, 2011

Some people may find scattered autumn leaves as something of a loaded chore; and they can be literally shedding everywhere. Other than exerting the extra effort to sweep or rake these off of your lawn, additional garbage is also accumulated inside your garbage bins. But there are now several ways to eliminating these leaves, and putting each piece into good use. Fall composting is one solution; and it can certainly help create something significant out of your precious, fallen leaves.

The importance of leaf collection
Composting leaves can help lawns from experiencing damages such as acquiring lawn diseases for one. It is a fact that when thick layers of whole leaves are left on the ground, your lawn will gradually have to endure a few injuries. So gather all of the leaves so that your lawn gets that much needed sunlight. Also collect every leaf on the ground so that moisture is not held or trapped in. With this in perspective, you can also start gathering all of the leaves in sight by means of raking, blowing, or manual picking.
Don’t burn your leaves!
Burning fall leaves may be an easy way out. But it can also contribute more into the existing air pollution. So the best option for you is to simply compost these organic scraps. But if you’re not up for the task, you can always collect these for your town to use (leaf compost can be used to supplement public gardens and parks). Most communities actually use leaf compost for nourishing their garden soil and plants. So don’t burn your leaves. Compost these so that you can reap a free and nutritious organic fertilizer and soil amendment.
Leaf composting within your premises
Now, as far as construction goes, you can go as simple as creating a ring made out chicken wire material. You can also have this molded outdoors, as an outdoor setup usually helps hold more leaves throughout the year. But don’t be restricted, as you can also compost indoors using a specialized composter.  Now with this setup, you can already leave the leaves to compost down on its own. But of course, make sure that you only pile leaves that have been previously shredded (can be mowed over or placed inside a leaf shredder) and dampened with water. Not only will this technique reduce bulkiness, shredded leaves will also be able to breakdown much faster.
The importance of aerating the compost system
Make it a point to have your shredded or chopped leaves mixed and aerated to continuously introduce oxygen into the composting system. The live microorganisms that are actually present in the compost also live on air. So when you’re fall composting, make it a habit to aerate the compost regularly. This will not only help the leaves to breakdown faster, it will also keep the material from producing smelly odors.
GardenWorms.com recommends the time is right to compost
According to master composter, Kathy Rubino, composting “has been a gardener’s and farmer’s best friend since the beginning. All organic matter eventually breaks down. Composting your own leaves uses the same principles that nature uses.” So when is the right time to compost? The right time is now. Composting can be a year-round thing, so you can definitely start today.
To know more about he time is right to compost article, check northjersey.com here.

Some people may find scattered autumn leaves as something of a loaded chore; and they can be literally shedding everywhere. Other than exerting the extra effort to sweep or rake these off of your lawn, additional garbage is also accumulated inside your garbage bins. But there are now several ways to eliminating these leaves, and putting each piece into good use. Fall composting is one solution; and it can certainly help create something significant out of your precious, fallen leaves.

The importance of leaf collection

Composting leaves can help lawns from experiencing damages such as acquiring lawn diseases for one. It is a fact that when thick layers of whole leaves are left on the ground, your lawn will gradually have to endure a few injuries. So gather all of the leaves so that your lawn gets that much needed sunlight. Also collect every leaf on the ground so that moisture is not held or trapped in. With this in perspective, you can also start gathering all of the leaves in sight by means of raking, blowing, or manual picking.

Don’t burn your leaves!

Burning fall leaves may be an easy way out. But it can also contribute more into the existing air pollution. So the best option for you is to simply compost these organic scraps. But if you’re not up for the task, you can always collect these for your town to use (leaf compost can be used to supplement public gardens and parks). Most communities actually use leaf compost for nourishing their garden soil and plants. So don’t burn your leaves. Compost these so that you can reap a free and nutritious organic fertilizer and soil amendment.

Leaf composting within your premises

Now, as far as construction goes, you can go as simple as creating a ring made out chicken wire material. You can also have this molded outdoors, as an outdoor setup usually helps hold more leaves throughout the year. But don’t be restricted, as you can also compost indoors using a specialized composter.  Now with this setup, you can already leave the leaves to compost down on its own. But of course, make sure that you only pile leaves that have been previously shredded (can be mowed over or placed inside a leaf shredder) and dampened with water. Not only will this technique reduce bulkiness, shredded leaves will also be able to breakdown much faster.

The importance of aerating the compost system

Make it a point to have your shredded or chopped leaves mixed and aerated to continuously introduce oxygen into the composting system. The live microorganisms that are actually present in the compost also live on air. So when you’re fall composting, make it a habit to aerate the compost regularly. This will not only help the leaves to breakdown faster, it will also keep the material from producing smelly odors.

GardenWorms.com recommends the time is right to compost

According to master composter, Kathy Rubino, composting “has been a gardener’s and farmer’s best friend since the beginning. All organic matter eventually breaks down. Composting your own leaves uses the same principles that nature uses.” So when is the right time to compost? The right time is now. Composting can be a year-round thing, so you can definitely start today.

Planting in raised garden beds

December 17th, 2011

School and Community Projects:

A multitude of schools and community projects have already been established to help educate people on the significance of composting and gardening; and of making good use of the many resources within our environment. But there’s another great solution to keeping the soil of our gardens healthy and pest-free; and that it is through planting in raised garden beds. Building raised garden beds is an innovation in itself.

Students, Faculty and Staff learn from the dirt
The students, faculty members and staff from the Sacramento City College have started a City Farm project. The project consists of a community garden that will help function as an ‘alternative teaching mechanism for multiple disciplines throughout the school year’. It is through these different disciplines that ‘learning from the dirt’ was conceptualized. Based on that, hands-on learning was also encouraged through gardening. Therefore, a few 12-foot by 4-foot raised garden bed plans were placed and assembled for their usage.
The Importance of a drip irrigation system in a raised garden bed
Each of Sacramento City College’s garden beds were built to include a drip irrigation system. Now, when it comes to the irrigation system (this goes especially important when you build a raised garden bed of your own), it functions as the main approach for supplying water into the garden bed. It works through a slow but frequent application of water, which goes all the way to the soil. The system also helps supply the garden with the right amount of water, at just the right rate. Through a drip irrigation system, dry spots or drenches will be prevented from occurring.
What to grow in raised garden beds?
Small-scale projects can evolve from just using any of the typical wooden or plastic diy raised garden beds. A variety of plants, fruits, vegetables, flowers, and even herbs, can be planted in these plots. Aside from that, growing vegetables in garden beds can definitely teach young kids the science behind a plant’s life cycle. Students will be able to learn how their food is grown, how other plants bloom and increase in yield, and how they themselves can grow these in their own plot.
Just take for example the project under Disney Elementary School, which gives kids a chance to grow their own crops. Whether the plants are grown in wood or plastic raised garden beds, these children are kept exposed to gardening, and seeing firsthand the joys to a continuous crop growth. They are shown how some plants grow from the ground, and how some of these can be of consumption.
The benefits to having a raised garden bed
There are a lot of advantages when you have garden beds that are raised from the ground, other than it requiring less upkeep (compared to the typical gardens). Besides providing a solution to keeping the soil healthy, raised garden beds also contain soil that doesn’t get compacted (due to the reliability in its construction). It also drains water better, and warms faster when it’s springtime.

Students, Faculty and Staff learn from the dirt

The students, faculty members and staff from the Sacramento City College have started a City Farm project. The project consists of a community garden that will help function as an ‘alternative teaching mechanism for multiple disciplines throughout the school year’. It is through these different disciplines that ‘learning from the dirt’ was conceptualized. Based on that, hands-on learning was also encouraged through gardening. Therefore, a few 12-foot by 4-foot raised garden bed plans were placed and assembled for their usage.

The Importance of a drip irrigation system in a raised garden bed

Each of Sacramento City College’s garden beds were built to include a drip irrigation system. Now, when it comes to the irrigation system (this goes especially important when you build a raised garden bed of your own), it functions as the main approach for supplying water into the garden bed. It works through a slow but frequent application of water, which goes all the way to the soil. The system also helps supply the garden with the right amount of water, at just the right rate. Through a drip irrigation system, dry spots or drenches will be prevented from occurring.

What to grow in raised garden beds?

Small-scale projects can evolve from just using any of the typical wooden or plastic diy raised garden beds. A variety of plants, fruits, vegetables, flowers, and even herbs, can be planted in these plots. Aside from that, growing vegetables in garden beds can definitely teach young kids the science behind a plant’s life cycle. Students will be able to learn how their food is grown, how other plants bloom and increase in yield, and how they themselves can grow these in their own plot.

Just take for example the project under Disney Elementary School, which gives kids a chance to grow their own crops. Whether the plants are grown in wood or plastic raised garden beds, these children are kept exposed to gardening, and seeing firsthand the joys to a continuous crop growth. They are shown how some plants grow from the ground, and how some of these can be of consumption.

The benefits to having a raised garden bed

There are a lot of advantages when you have garden beds that are raised from the ground, other than it requiring less upkeep (compared to the typical gardens). Besides providing a solution to keeping the soil healthy, raised garden beds also contain soil that doesn’t get compacted (due to the reliability in its construction). It also drains water better, and warms faster when it’s springtime.